HTC Hero smartphone

Boasting HTC's Sense UI, the HTC Hero is without doubt the best Android phone yet and the closet competitor to the iPhone we've seen.

HTC Hero
  • HTC Hero
  • HTC Hero
  • HTC Hero
  • Expert Rating

    4.50 / 5

Pros

  • Distinctive design, Teflon-coated casing, Sense UI is excellent, user-friendly and a joy to use, Android platform, fully customisable, polished Web browser, 3.5mm headphone jack, contacts integration with social networking

Cons

  • Interface feels sluggish at various times, on-screen keyboard is a little frustrating

Bottom Line

The HTC Hero is without doubt one of the most impressive smartphones we've reviewed. The design is distinctive, the user interface is absolutely superb and it's packed with all the latest features. Unfortunately, the Hero doesn't seem to have the hardware needed to keep up with its innovative software, resulting in a sometimes slow and frustrating user experience. It remains a superb phone that is really only let down by slow performance.

Would you buy this?

HTC Hero

Part of HTC's Sense UI is the home screen of the Hero. It consists of seven screens that can be swiped from side to side to reveal any number of shortcuts, folders or widgets.

Another impressive feature of the HTC Hero is the integration of contacts with social-networking sites like Facebook. Contacts in your address book can be matched with Facebook contacts, so you can use a person's profile picture, see details of their birthday and view status updates all from a single contact screen. When you view a single contact, you can also see all interactions with that particular person: information, messages, mail, updates and events, photo albums on both Facebook and Flickr, and call history. This is an excellent feature and one that isn't available on the iPhone.

The HTC Hero's on-screen keyboard has also been tweaked from the standard Google Android version seen on the Magic. Although it's useable and comfortable in most instances, it lacks the polish of the iPhone's on-screen keyboard. We often found ourselves having to tap more than once to register a key and there is noticeable lag when typing at fast speeds. We also preferred typing in the regular portrait mode rather than tilting the phone sideways to use the landscape keyboard. On a positive note, we found the auto-correction excellent in most instances.

Like all Android devices, the HTC Hero's integration with Google services is excellent. Android automatically synchronises your Google calendar, mail and contacts over the air. When you add a new contact or calendar event on your PC, it will automatically appear on your phone and vice versa. If you don't have a Google account, you can create one on the HTC Hero itself; you can then easily import a contact list from Microsoft Outlook or even Apple's address book. Support for Microsoft Exchange is included out of the box.

As a multimedia device, the HTC Hero fares much better than both the Magic and the Dream, mainly thanks to the inclusion of a regular 3.5mm headphone jack. The music application and widget are slick and polished but lack the smoothness of the iPhone. The Hero has a 5-megapixel camera without a flash. It's annoying taking a photo using the trackball: your finger can slide around when attempting to click the trackball. The quality of recorded video is poor, but it remains a solid camera phone. The Hero comes with 512MB of flash memory, and it also has a microSD card slot for extra storage.

The included Web browser is excellent and, unlike the iPhone, the HTC Hero supports Flash. The browser is responsive, polished and easy to use. Like Safari on the iPhone, it also supports multitouch, so you can zoom in and our by pinching your fingers on the screen. A version of the Google Maps application is strangely absent, though it is downloadable from the Android Market — Android's application store.

We found the HTC Hero's battery life to be slightly better than the iPhone 3GS', though it's still not great compared to other smartphones. The Hero just lasted a full day even with hourly push e-mail, Twitter, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth all turned on. You can squeeze some extra precious hours out of the Hero by turning off some of these settings, though they are all part of the experience.

Australian online store MobiCity is selling the HTC Hero outright with a 12 month warranty.

Follow GoodGearGuide on Twitter: @GoodGearGuide

Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?