Anything but IE: Microsoft searches for new browser's name

Microsoft has confirmed that the new default browser in Windows 10 will not be named "Internet Explorer."

Microsoft yesterday confirmed that the new default browser in Windows 10 will not be named "Internet Explorer," essentially marking the end of a 20-year reign by the nameplate.

A new name was not disclosed, however.

"We're right now researching what the new brand, or the new name, for our browser should be in Windows 10," said Chris Capossela, Microsoft's chief marketing officer, during a discussion of branding Monday at the firm's Convergence conference. "We'll continue to have Internet Explorer, but we'll also have a new browser called Project Spartan, which is codenamed Project Spartan. And we have to name the thing."

Microsoft has talked about Spartan before: In January, when the company touted Windows 10's consumer-oriented features, it officially announced the new browser, dubbing it with the code name. Spartan, executives said then, would be the default Web browser for the new OS, although Internet Explorer will also be bundled with Windows 10, primarily for enterprise legacy requirements.

The clear implication was that Spartan would be tagged with a name different than "Internet Explorer," or its shorthand, "IE."

Capossela made that plain Monday when he talked about working up a new moniker.

According to people familiar with Microsoft's plans, it will not reveal Spartan's name until May, most likely at Ignite, the conference slated to run May 4-8 in Chicago. Ignite will roll up TechEd with several older, often-smaller meetings, including those that specialized in Exchange and SharePoint.

If Capossela's commentary on brand strength yesterday was any guide, whatever name the Redmond, Wash. company selects will include "Microsoft," probably as a preface.

"We have a long history of really favoring our product brands over our company brands," Capossela said. "But a couple of things have changed. We know consumers are choosing an ecosystem more than ever. They might buy one device at a time, but as soon as they buy a device they're getting pulled into an Apple ecosystem or an Android ecosystem or a Windows or Microsoft ecosystem."

Read more: Windows 10 embraces iris scans, facial recognition

And according to its studies, "Microsoft" is the best branding choice. "The brand is just incredibly strong. While Windows is a strong brand and Office is a strong brand, the Microsoft brand is actually the strongest one we have," Capossela said.

When U.K. consumers who used Google's Chrome browser were asked to pick from a list of potential names for Project Spartan, they much preferred those with "Microsoft" as the first word. "Microsoft A," for instance -- where A was a placeholder for a name Capossela wouldn't reveal -- scored 182 out of 200, while simply "A" received 145.

Capossela's data also illustrated -- probably not coincidentally -- why Microsoft is dumping the IE nomenclature: The name "Internet Explorer A" scored 113, and "IE A" came in at 107, just barely above the current "Internet Explorer" at 106.

It's no surprise that Microsoft wants to push the Internet Explorer brand into the background. For all its improvements over the years, IE continues to drag along past baggage of negativity, notably a reputation -- gained from earlier versions, notably IE6 -- as difficult for developers and site designers to support and an also-ran in speed and Web standards-support. Those are now largely moot, but the name, as Capossela's numbers showed, remains toxic.

Microsoft may have other reasons to divorce IE: A newly-named browser would let it change the support policy to match Chrome's and Firefox's, which are updated every few weeks and officially supported only in the latest edition.

The Windows 10 Technical Preview will be refreshed shortly -- perhaps this week -- but Microsoft has not revealed when the first build of Spartan will be included in the sneak peek.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags web browsersMicrosoftWindows 10internet

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Gregg Keizer

Computerworld (US)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?