In rerun of Apple debacle, Samsung apologizes in China after state media criticism

Earlier this week, Chinese state media alleged flaws in Samsung phones

A Samsung show booth in Beijing, China.

A Samsung show booth in Beijing, China.

Months after Apple apologized to consumers in China, Korean rival Samsung is doing the same after the country's state media criticized the vendor for failing to fix glitches in several of its phone models.

"We welcome the scrutiny from the media," Samsung posted to its China website on Wednesday. "Due to problems with management that brought inconvenience to our customers, the company expresses its sincerest of apologies."

Earlier this week, the country's state-controlled China Central Television aired a 30-minute segment that put a spotlight on flaws found in Samsung phones. The affected models include handsets which are part of Samsung's Galaxy S3 and Note 2 product line.

According to CCTV's report, a software glitch in the phones can permanently damage a memory chip within the device's motherboard. This can cause the phone to frequently crash, from 20 to 30 times a day, according to one Galaxy S3 owner interviewed in the segment.

Samsung, however, refused to properly acknowledge the problem, CCTV claimed in its report. Instead, the company said the glitch could be fixed with a software update, rather than replacing the phone's hardware.

In response, Samsung issued an apology on Wednesday, and said it would offer free repairs or replace phones with persistent problems. In addition, all affected phone models will receive another year of warranty protection, regardless of whether they showed any glitches.

Samsung is just the latest tech company to be scrutinized by China's state press. In March, Apple faced similar criticism over its warranty policies, which CCTV alleged treated U.S. customers more favorably than those in China.

Apple later apologized in April, and made changes to its policies.

Other foreign companies have also been targets. This past week, Starbucks has been defending itself after CCTV criticized the company for pricing its coffee products higher in China than in the U.S.

China's state press will regularly scrutinize companies, both foreign and domestic, as a way to regulate them, according to analysts. Apple and Samsung are two of the largest smartphone vendors in the country.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags smartphonesregulationAppleAndroidsamsungconsumer electronics

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?