Syria disappears from the Internet again

Virtually all network connections became unavailable Wednesday morning

Internet traffic to and from Syria, a country engulfed by civil war, again came to a halt on Wednesday, according to Internet monitoring company Renesys.

"Syrian Internet down again since 07:01 UTC (10:00 Damascus time), Wednesday, 15 May 2013," said Renesys in a blog post. The Google traffic report graph that provides information of traffic to the company's services per country also shows a service disruption.

"This is very similar to events that happened in the past," said Jim Cowie, CTO and co-founder of Renesys. The company monitors Internet connections around the world.

The previous outage lasted for more than 19 hours between May 7 and May 8, according to Renesys.

On Wednesday, virtually all Internet connections became unavailable from outside the country, Cowie said. "The routes were removed from the routing table," he said, adding that this means that no machines in Syria can be reached and all websites hosted in Syria appear to be offline from outside of the country.

"It may be the case that the Internet is still online in Syria," Cowie said. But there is no way to tell. "We can't reach them and they can't reach us," he said.

This deprives Syrians' to access important information, Cowie said. Many Arabic language Web sites are hosted in the E.U. or even in the U.S., he said.

According to a Google-translated report on Syria-News.com, the disruption was caused by a malfunctioning fiber optic cable. This, according to Syrian authorities, also caused last week's outage.

"It is a plausible explanation," said Cowie. But if it were a fiber optic cable it would probably have to be a domestic one and not one of the submarine cables, of which Syria has several, he said.

"If it is a physical problem it would have to be in a very critical building or cable," in Syria, he said.

Another possible cause of the outage could be that authorities ordered or caused the Internet to be shut down, Cowie said. One way to do this would be to cut off electricity to a critical switching facility, something that happened in Egypt last year, Cowie noted. "If the switches can't work the data can't flow," he said.

A more likely scenario is that, since the Syrian communications authority essentially controls Internet access in Syria, it shut down access administratively by logging into routers and switching them off, he said. If that is the case, the Syrian Internet can become fully functional again within 30 seconds, if authorities decide to restore access, Cowie said.

Meanwhile, some Syrian's might be able to access the Internet through satellite dishes or phones, as well as via dialup routers, Cowie added.

In a blog post, Cowie speculated that the disruption might be related to an expected U.N. General Assembly vote Wednesday to approve a resolution calling for a political transition in Syria and condemning President Bashar Assad's regime for its use of heavy weapons.

Loek is Amsterdam Correspondent and covers online privacy, intellectual property, open-source and online payment issues for the IDG News Service. Follow him on Twitter at @loekessers or email tips and comments to loek_essers@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags internetRenesys

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Loek Essers

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?