Symantec finds Linux wiper malware used in S. Korean attacks

The attacks also targeted Windows computers' master boot records

Security vendors analyzing the code used in the cyberattacks against South Korea are finding nasty components designed to wreck infected computers.

Tucked inside a piece of Windows malware used in the attacks is a component that erases Linux machines, an analysis from Symantec has found. The malware, which it called Jokra, is unusual, Symantec said.

"We do not normally see components that work on multiple operating systems, so it is interesting to discover that the attackers included a component to wipe Linux machines inside a Windows threat," the company said on its blog.

Jokra also checks computers running Windows XP and 7 for a program called mRemote, which is a remote access tool that can used to manage devices on different platforms, Symantec said.

South Korea is investigating the Wednesday attacks that disrupted at least three television stations and four banks. Government officials reportedly cautioned against blaming North Korea.

McAfee also published an analysis of the attack code, which wrote over a computer's master boot record, which is the first sector of the computer's hard drive that the computer checks before the operating system is booted.

A computer's MBR is overwritten with either one of two similar strings: "PRINCPES" or "PR!NCPES." The damage can be permanent, McAfee wrote. If the MBR is corrupted, the computer won't start.

"The attack also overwrote random parts of the file system with the same strings, rendering several files unrecoverable," wrote Jorge Arias and Guilherme Venere, both malware analysts at McAfee. "So even if the MBR is recovered, the files on disk will be compromised too."

The malware also attempts to shut down two South Korean antivirus products made by the companies Ahnlab and Hauri. Another component, a BASH shell script, attempts to erase partitions Unix systems, including Linux and HP-UX.

Security vendor Avast wrote on its blog that the attacks against South Korean banks originated from the website of the Korean Software Property Right Council.

The site had been hacked to serve up an iframe that delivered an attack hosted on another website, Avast said. The actual attack code exploits a vulnerability in Internet Explorer dating from July 2012, which has been patched by Microsoft.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags malwaredata protectiondata breachsymantec

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jeremy Kirk

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Father’s Day Gift Guide

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Luke Hill

MSI GT75 TITAN

I need power and lots of it. As a Front End Web developer anything less just won’t cut it which is why the MSI GT75 is an outstanding laptop for me. It’s a sleek and futuristic looking, high quality, beast that has a touch of sci-fi flare about it.

Emily Tyson

MSI GE63 Raider

If you’re looking to invest in your next work horse laptop for work or home use, you can’t go wrong with the MSI GE63.

Laura Johnston

MSI GS65 Stealth Thin

If you can afford the price tag, it is well worth the money. It out performs any other laptop I have tried for gaming, and the transportable design and incredible display also make it ideal for work.

Andrew Teoh

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

Touch screen visibility and operation was great and easy to navigate. Each menu and sub-menu was in an understandable order and category

Louise Coady

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

The printer was convenient, produced clear and vibrant images and was very easy to use

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?