MIPS looks to challenge ARM's tablet dominance with smaller CPU

MIPS Technologies says its proAptiv CPU will be half the size of ARM's Cortex A-15 but will equal it on performance

MIPS Technologies hopes to challenge ARM in the market for high-end tablets and smartphones with an upcoming processor design it presented at the Hot Chips conference in Silicon Valley on Tuesday.

MIPS is known for chips used in home entertainment products such as digital TVs and Blu-ray disc players, but its processor designs are also used in a few tablets, including one made by Philips. They are mostly lower-end Android devices sold in emerging markets like China and Indonesia.

It hopes to move up the food chain with a new processor design called proAptiv, an implementation of its MIPS32 architecture.

MIPS says its proAptiv core will be half the size of ARM's upcoming Cortex-A15 CPU but offer equivalent or greater performance. That could help manufacturers to build smartphones and tablets that compete better with Apple's iPhone and iPad, something they have so far struggled to do.

"It's pretty much a direct competitor for the Cortex-A15," said Mark Throndson, product marketing director at MIPS, on the sidelines of the Hot Chips conference.

The new design is still a way from finding its way into a finished product, however, and it remains to be seen if MIPS can challenge ARM, whose chips dominate the smartphone and tablet markets.

Like ARM, MIPS doesn't manufacture chips itself; it licenses its designs to other companies. The completed design for the proAptiv, known as the "production RTL," will be available to licensees this quarter, or by the end of September, Throndson said.

It takes a chip maker about 18 months to turn a CPU design into a finished system-on-chip, so he doesn't expect the first smartphones and tablets with proAptiv inside to go on sale for about two years.

That's a long time to wait, but there are some encouraging early signs. MIPS has published a performance score for proAptiv based on the CoreMark benchmark that Microprocessor Report, an industry publication, said was a single-core record for licensable CPUs.

"MIPS faces a number of business challenges before it can seize the high ground in mobile markets, but the technical features of its Aptiv product family should make the market for licensable CPU cores much more competitive," wrote Scott Gardner, senior editor for Microprocessor Report.

He also noted that it "remains to be seen if real application performance will match up to the high CoreMark score." Still, since Intel has failed to make a significant dent in ARM's business, it won't hurt consumers to have another competitor to keep ARM on its toes.

The proAptiv's smaller die size will help cut silicon costs for manufacturers and lessen power consumption, Throndson said. And MIPS expects to charge manufacturers a lower license fees than ARM, he said.

It takes more than good technology to challenge ARM's dominance in mobile devices, however, said Chris Rowen, founder and CTO of Tensilica, which designs and licenses dataplane processor cores and who saw the MIPS presentation at Hot Chips Tuesday.

ARM has numerous factors on its side, he noted, including a big ecosystem of customers and partners, and software developers who are familiar with its architecture and its tools.

"Building a high quality architecture -- and there's every reason to think proAptiv fits that category -- gives them a shot," Rowen said. "But it's also the case they have to play the game around ARM's rules, and that's tough."

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

James Niccolai

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Azadeh Williams

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

A smarter way to print for busy small business owners, combining speedy printing with scanning and copying, making it easier to produce high quality documents and images at a touch of a button.

Andrew Grant

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

I've had a multifunction printer in the office going on 10 years now. It was a neat bit of kit back in the day -- print, copy, scan, fax -- when printing over WiFi felt a bit like magic. It’s seen better days though and an upgrade’s well overdue. This HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 looks like it ticks all the same boxes: print, copy, scan, and fax. (Really? Does anyone fax anything any more? I guess it's good to know the facility’s there, just in case.) Printing over WiFi is more-or- less standard these days.

Ed Dawson

HP OfficeJet Pro 8730

As a freelance writer who is always on the go, I like my technology to be both efficient and effective so I can do my job well. The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 Inkjet Printer ticks all the boxes in terms of form factor, performance and user interface.

Michael Hargreaves

Windows 10 for Business / Dell XPS 13

I’d happily recommend this touchscreen laptop and Windows 10 as a great way to get serious work done at a desk or on the road.

Aysha Strobbe

Windows 10 / HP Spectre x360

Ultimately, I think the Windows 10 environment is excellent for me as it caters for so many different uses. The inclusion of the Xbox app is also great for when you need some downtime too!

Mark Escubio

Windows 10 / Lenovo Yoga 910

For me, the Xbox Play Anywhere is a great new feature as it allows you to play your current Xbox games with higher resolutions and better graphics without forking out extra cash for another copy. Although available titles are still scarce, but I’m sure it will grow in time.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?