New Relic now monitors server performance

The Web application performance service is adding hardware monitoring to the offering

New Relic is adding server monitoring to its Web application performance service, it announced Tuesday.

Developers who use New Relic's hosted service to monitor the health of their applications will now be able to measure server CPU utilization, memory, I/O throughput and other hardware processes.

Users can then look at which applications are running on a server and move into New Relic's application management view to see how a server problem is affecting application performance. In addition, the user can look at New Relic's real user monitoring tool to see how the problem is affecting users around the world. The application management and real user monitoring tools are already available in New Relic.

With the new service, New Relic isn't trying to compete with existing server monitoring tools, said Bill Lapcevic, vice president of business development at New Relic. "This is focused on the app team" at a business, which often has no insight into hardware performance, he said.

App developers typically look for problems with their code to see what's causing bottlenecks in a service. "There's also a situation where the code is doing well but the servers are failing," he said. The new feature can help in that scenario.

New Relic might now be attractive to some companies that are using various open-source tools for server management, he said. Those tools are often difficult to install and maintain and aren't very easy to use, he said.

Developers can use New Relic to monitor applications, and now servers, running in private clouds and some public clouds including Amazon Web Services, Heroku, Rackspace, GoGrid, Engine Yard and others.

The server monitoring capability is included in the New Relic service for no additional cost. Pricing for New Relic starts at US$24 per server per month up to $149 per month per server, depending on features. Other pricing applies on some clouds like Heroku, where developers get a basic version free and otherwise pay based on Heroku's own pricing model.

Nancy Gohring covers mobile phones and cloud computing for The IDG News Service. Follow Nancy on Twitter at @idgnancy. Nancy's e-mail address is Nancy_Gohring@idg.com

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Nancy Gohring

IDG News Service
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