Intel hopes to boost flagging AppUp store

Compared to other app stores, AppUp's usage has been poor

Intel is making some changes to its AppUp store in hopes of improving what it admits has been dismal usage.

During its AppUp Elements conference for developers in Seattle, Intel said that 807,000 applications have been downloaded and 350,000 consumers have registered to use the store. The store, which launched in 2010, was designed to spur application development for netbooks. It also includes apps for PCs.

"We've sucked on getting consumers. It's proved more of a challenge for us than we thought," said Peter Biddle, general manager for AppUp.

To help spur usage, Intel plans to offer new features that developers can add to their apps, like in-app billing. In addition, it plans to offer a service that easily connects developers to other services they may want to tie into their applications, like location information or restaurant reviews.

It also plans to offer ways that third parties can curate the store. "We thought, maybe we should just try to compete directly with iTunes, but that seemed like a step back," said Biddle. "But now we're stepping forward. We're embracing the notion that the world will be good about telling other parts of the world about the neat things they've found."

Apple's App Store is the largest of its kind but has been criticized for being so large that it's difficult for people to find useful applications. In hopes of avoiding that kind of problem, Intel will allow people to create their own stores. For instance, someone with a photography website could build a store to steer people to photography-related apps in AppUp.

Intel already has 22 curators today but expects to have thousands in the future, it said.

Intel also announced on Wednesday the AppUp Creator, a beta service aimed at making it easy for anyone to build applications. Users can create a simple Web app and include elements like discussion forums, videos and photographs by dragging and dropping the elements onto a page.

Nancy Gohring covers mobile phones and cloud computing for The IDG News Service. Follow Nancy on Twitter at @idgnancy. Nancy's e-mail address is Nancy_Gohring@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags intelsoftwareapplication development

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Nancy Gohring

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?