China censors Web to curb Inner Mongolia protests

Chinese microblogs are preventing users from searching for the term "Inner Mongolia"

China is blocking mention of Inner Mongolia on Chinese microblogs and social networking sites, as part of an effort to clamp down on protests that broke out last week in the region.

Two of the most popular microblog services operating in China no longer allow users to search for the term "Inner Mongolia." Sina's and Tencent's microblogs have 140 million and 160 million users, respectively.

Social networking site Renren, nicknamed "Facebook of China", is also preventing users from posting about "Inner Mongolia." Renren users who have registered China's Inner Mongolia region as their hometown also reported that their friends cannot fully view their user pages.

The censorship comes after protests erupted in the region when an ethnic Mongolian shepherd was run over by an ethnic Han truck driver, according to human rights groups. Ethnic Mongolians in the region have taken to the streets, prompting authorities to declare martial law in some of the cities.

The Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center said on its website that China's most popular instant messenger service QQ, which helped organize the mass protests, has been shutdown in the region.

The Inner Mongolia region of China borders Mongolia and has a population of 24 million people. Only 17 percent of the region's population is Mongolian. About 78 percent of the population are from the country's main ethnic Han group.

China has 457 million Web users, according to the China Internet Network Information Center. But the country regularly blocks politically sensitive content on the Web. Internet censorship has ramped up to new levels starting this year, according to experts. It was triggered by an online protest call urging Chinese people to stage a "Jasmine Revolution" against the government.

China responded by blocking any mention of the term "Jasmine" on Chinese microblogs. Google also reported that Chinese authorities were blocking Gmail, in what experts said was an effort to stifle communication between human rights activists.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags regulationinternetGoogleTencentSinaRenren

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?