Microsoft delivers Windows 7 SP1 blocking tools

Gives enterprises 12-month grace period before SP1 automatically reaches PCs

Microsoft has issued tools that let enterprises block the distribution of Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) when the upgrade launches next year.

Such toolkits are standard practice by Microsoft, which regularly ships blockers prior to shipping major Windows, Internet Explorer (IE) and Office updates.

The appearance of the toolkit is another hint that Microsoft is getting close to releasing Windows 7 SP1. In 2009, the company issued a blocker for IE8 about two months before delivering the finished software.

Microsoft has not publicly set a ship date for Windows 7 SP1, saying only that it would release the service pack in the first quarter of 2011.

Windows 7 SP1 moved to "release candidate" (RC) status three weeks ago.

The updated toolkit offers business IT administrators three ways to block the download of Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, including an executable, a script and a group policy administrative template. All three set or clear a registry key on selected PCs that detects and then bars service pack downloads.

As it has before, Microsoft put a 12-month expiration date on the block. A year after the service packs' public release, Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 will reach machines via Windows Update. PCs that have the update service set to automatically download and install important upgrades will then shift to the service pack.

The one-year interval is designed to give enterprises time to test the service packs before deploying them, while allowing other updates -- including security patches -- to reach systems in the interim.

Microsoft has downplayed the significance of Windows 7 SP1, noting several times that the upgrade will include "no additional new features specific to Windows 7." Instead, the update will comprise all of the fixes that have already been issued through Windows Update.

The toolkit can be downloaded from Microsoft's site.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Microsoftoperating systemssoftwareWindows

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Gregg Keizer

Gregg Keizer

Computerworld (US)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?