Adobe issues update for Flash, warning for Reader

Adobe was busy this week -- releasing an update for a Flash flaw and posting news of a security vulnerability in Adobe Reader

Yesterday was sort of a busy day for Adobe security. Of course, that doesn't seem like such an uncommon occurrence these days. Adobe issued an update to address a security flaw in Flash, and followed up with a new security advisory about a vulnerability impacting Adobe Reader.

The Adobe security bulletin for the Flash vulnerability provides details about the issue. "Critical vulnerabilities have been identified in Adobe Flash Player 10.1.85.3 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Solaris, and Adobe Flash Player 10.1.95.1 for Android. These vulnerabilities, including CVE-2010-3654 referenced in Security Advisory APSA10-05, could cause the application to crash and could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system."

Adobe has developed an updated version of Flash -- version 10.1.102.64 -- to address the problem. All users of affected versions of Adobe Flash are urged to upgrade to the newest version. Adobe has also developed a patched version of Flash Player 9 -- version 9.0.289.0 -- for those who can't move up to Flash Player 10. There is no fix yet for Adobe Flash Player for Android, but Adobe expects to have that update available on November 9, 2010.

Adobe also published a blog post describing a potential security threat affecting Adobe Reader. "Adobe is aware of a potential issue in Adobe Reader posted publicly today on the Full Disclosure list. A proof-of-concept file demonstrating a Denial of Service was published. Arbitrary code execution has not been demonstrated, but may be possible. We are currently investigating this issue."

Adobe stresses that the issue does not affect Adobe Acrobat, and that it is not currently aware of any attacks exploiting the Adobe Reader issue. Still, pending an actual patch or update, Adobe provides guidance to use the JavaScript Blacklist Framework to protect vulnerable systems.

The JavaScript Blacklist Framework is a mechanism for blocking vulnerable APIs rather than disabling JavaScript altogether. The blacklist is maintained in the Windows registry and the Macintosh OS X FeatureLockdown file. The Adobe blog post about the Reader issue includes step by step instructions to use the framework.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags flashAdobe Systemsonline security

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Tony Bradley

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?