Google drafts cloud printing plan for Chrome OS

The goal is to let users print from any application to any printer without the need for device drivers

Google's Chrome OS is a Web-centric platform ideal for netbooks [image: Google]

Google's Chrome OS is a Web-centric platform ideal for netbooks [image: Google]

Google is unveiling early-stage designs, software code and documentation of a project whose goal is to let users of the company's Chrome OS operating system print documents to any printer from any application.

Called Google Cloud Print, the technology would dispense with the need to install printer drivers by routing print jobs from Web, desktop and mobile applications via a Chrome OS Web-hosted broker.

"Rather than rely on the local operating system -- or drivers -- to print, apps can use Google Cloud Print to submit and manage print jobs. Google Cloud Print will then be responsible for sending the print job to the appropriate printer with the particular options the user selected, and returning the job status to the app," wrote Google Product Manager Mike Jazayeri in an official blog post.

While Google Cloud Print is still in its "early days," the company wants to engage interested developers and vendors in the process of developing this technology, according to Jazayeri.

Carl Howe, a Yankee Group analyst, said that it's smart of Google to envision printing as a cloud service instead of as a device.

"That's particularly key for netbooks and tablets that don't have printer ports or room for printer connectors," Howe said via e-mail. "It's just another example of how the new world of 'anywhere' computing is rapidly jettisoning our PC-conceived notions of how to do things."

Google released the open source Chrome OS to developers in November of last year. The first netbooks that run the OS are expected to hit the market late this year.

Chrome OS has been designed from the ground up for cloud computing, so it will only run Web-hosted applications. A big question has been how Chrome OS will interact with peripherals such as printers.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags cloud computingGoogleprinting

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Juan Carlos Perez

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Cate Bacon

Aruba Instant On AP11D

The strength of the Aruba Instant On AP11D is that the design and feature set support the modern, flexible, and mobile way of working.

Dr Prabigya Shiwakoti

Aruba Instant On AP11D

Aruba backs the AP11D up with a two-year warranty and 24/7 phone support.

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?