Study: Operators should use DNSSEC to improve security

While cost and complexity turn operators off, one expert says rolling out the technology isn't as taxing as companies imagine

Various challenges are making many operators hesitate to adopt DNSSEC (Domain Name System Security Extensions) to prevent hackers from tampering with DNS information and redirecting Web traffic, according to a study from European Union's cybersecurity agency.

DNS is a key building block of the Internet. The technology's most important task is translating IP (Internet Protocol) addresses to host names, and DNSSEC is used to protect that process.

Operators agree that the deployment of DNSSEC provides a much needed improvement on security.

But 56 percent are still considering whether to implement it, and 22 percent do not plan to implement it in the next three years, according to the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) study (http://www.enisa.europa.eu/doc/pdf/resilience_tech_report.pdf).

A lack of customer demand for DNSSEC and the cost of deployment are two of the main reasons for operators either hesitating or choosing not to implement the technology in the near future, according to ENISA.

Operators that have rolled out DNSSEC cite the complexity of deploying the technology as the greatest challenge, in part because of a lack of tools for automating the operation process.

There is also a lack of security policies focusing on DNSSEC security guidelines, key management and recommendations, ENISA said.

Putting pressure on software vendors and operators to add support for DNSSEC would get it implemented much faster, said Torbjörn Eklöv, a security expert at consulting firm Interlan, who has implemented the technology at Swedish municipalities.

The general lack of awareness and understanding of DNSSEC also means that companies overestimate the expense and difficulty of actually implementing it, said Eklöv.

He claimed that he can implement the technology at a Swedish municipality in less than a day.

Companies should spend as much energy and resources on securing DNS as they currently do on firewalls and spam protection, he said.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags DNSDNSSEC

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Mikael Ricknäs

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?