How Obama might get his way on BlackBerry

Security experts reveal what pitfalls he may be underestimating.

Naysayers aside, President-elect Obama appears determined to take office Tuesday with his BlackBerry — or at least some PDA — firmly in hand. Here's how experts say he might pull it off — and what pitfalls he may be underestimating.

The Presidential Records Act requires retention of the bulk of documents generated by the president for public review at a later date, so any message Obama creates with his BlackBerry would have to be retained and stored, subject to scrutiny in the future. But the larger problem is that the BlackBerry is unlikely to get the nod as the presidential wireless handheld from the National Security Agency (NSA) or other federal entities with a traditional oversight role in top-secret communications security, according to experts.

"The most significant issue here is security," says Randy Sabett, partner at Washington-based law firm Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal LLP. "The number one target of anyone anywhere in the world would be the e-mail communications of the most powerful man in the world, the president of the United States." Sabett, who has worked at the NSA, says that "nation-states, terrorist organizations and criminal gangs" could all be expected to be trying to break into a president's BlackBerry.

There is a version of the BlackBerry that uses AES-256 encryption, which has been approved by the Defense Department for sensitive communications. Research in Motion, maker of the BlackBerry, points to a number of government and third-party security certifications as evidence that its key-management system is secure.

A November 2008 certification by the Fraunhofer Institute for Secure Information technology in Germany, for example, gave a positive evaluation to the BlackBerry's use of cryptographic algorithms and life-cycle management of shared secrets or keys and passwords.

But for top-secret communications, the NSA has a history of turning to select manufacturers for custom-designed equipment. These include the high-security STU-III phones or the more recent Secure Mobile Environment/Portable Electronic Device program under which General Dynamics built the Sectera Edge smartphone and PDA.

This Sectera is compliant with what's called the Secure Communications Interoperability Protocol and the High Assurance Internet Protocol Encryptor Interoperability Specification for secure interoperability with in-line encryption devices used on the government's Secure Internet Router Network (SIPRnet).

L-3 Communications has also built an SME PDE-style PDA called the Guardian, which is undergoing certification.

But use of any PDA smartphone remains problematic for a president.

Smartphones are programmable devices and "local devices are increasingly vulnerable to attacks by injecting hostile software onto the device," says Phil Zimmermann, a fellow at the Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, and creator in 1991 of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), the public-key encryption and authentication system.

"If that code can gain control of the device, it could take such actions as activate the microphone, record his conversations and then transmit them somewhere," Zimmermann says. "You're being ratted out by the device in your pocket."

Potentially, the device could even "rat out" your location, he adds, because many smartphones provide highly accurate GPS capabilities.

While a simple BlackBerry for the president may not get the thumbs-up from the NSA, Obama should not necessarily consider this the final word, says security expert Bruce Schneier.

"Look, he can decide to paint the White House blue if he wants," Schneier says. "The Internet is the greatest generation gap since rock and roll. . . . The NSA will tell you the risks, but they will never say here's what the benefits are." Obama might be so productive and effective with a BlackBerry or other PDA, it would outweigh the risks.

But Schneier also acknowledges the risk of hacking the presidential PDA is high and in any event, it is not possible to have absolute certainty that e-mail actually came from Obama.

"No encryption program solves that," says Schneier.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags BlackberryBarack Obama

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Ellen Messmer

Network World
Show Comments

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Maryellen Rose George

Brother PT-P750W

It’s useful for office tasks as well as pragmatic labelling of equipment and storage – just don’t get too excited and label everything in sight!

Cathy Giles

Brother MFC-L8900CDW

The Brother MFC-L8900CDW is an absolute stand out. I struggle to fault it.

Luke Hill

MSI GT75 TITAN

I need power and lots of it. As a Front End Web developer anything less just won’t cut it which is why the MSI GT75 is an outstanding laptop for me. It’s a sleek and futuristic looking, high quality, beast that has a touch of sci-fi flare about it.

Emily Tyson

MSI GE63 Raider

If you’re looking to invest in your next work horse laptop for work or home use, you can’t go wrong with the MSI GE63.

Laura Johnston

MSI GS65 Stealth Thin

If you can afford the price tag, it is well worth the money. It out performs any other laptop I have tried for gaming, and the transportable design and incredible display also make it ideal for work.

Andrew Teoh

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

Touch screen visibility and operation was great and easy to navigate. Each menu and sub-menu was in an understandable order and category

Featured Content

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?