FAQ: XP deathwatch, T minus zero

Monday marked the beginning of the end of the seven-year-old operating system

Yesterday was the day. That's it for Windows XP.

Monday marked the beginning of the end of the seven-year-old operating system, as Microsoft stops offering licenses to most big name computer makers and halts shipments of boxed copies to retailers. But even as Microsoft pushes XP toward retirement, the venerable OS will remain on the radar. That, in turn, means questions continue even as our series comes to a close.

Any sign that Microsoft will commute XP's death sentence?

Absolutely not. In fact, the only word out of Redmond last week about Windows XP was the open letter to customers from Bill Veghte, the senior vice president who heads the Windows business marketing group, which nailed shut XP's coffin. In that letter, Veghte reiterated earlier promises by Microsoft that it retire XP on June 30.

Rather than grant a reprieve, Veghte trumpeted "downgrades" as a way to get XP on a new PC after Monday. Several of the biggest computer manufacturers, including Hewlett-Packard, Dell, and Lenovo, will continue to offer the older operating system as a downgrade option from Windows Vista. "This is a great value, because it lets you use Windows XP on new PCs today if you need it and then make the move to...Windows Vista when you are ready, without having to pay for an upgrade," Veghte said in the letter.

Can I still get an XP PC from one of the name-brand makers?

Only if you go the downgrade route. Dell extended sales of a few XP models in its Inspiron consumer line through last Thursday morning, but pulled the deal on schedule. HP, Lenovo, Acer and others also have stopped selling XP-powered machines, except for those downgraded to XP Professional from Windows Vista Business or Vista Ultimate.

A quick check Sunday of the Best Buy, Circuit City and Wal-Mart sites turned up only Vista machines.

No exceptions?

There are always exceptions.

Back in April, Microsoft said makers of sub-sized laptops could install the older OS for another two years, through the end of June 2010. Early this month, it added another hardware category, low-end, low-priced desktops dubbed "net-tops" by some, to that list.

Best Buy's online store, for example, showed limited availability of Asus Computer Inc.'s Eee PC bundled with XP Home.

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Gregg Keizer

Computerworld
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