Making the phone-PC connection

Instead of just making mobile phones, PC makers should make mobile phones work better with PCs

It seems these days that every Tom, Dick and Harry -- or, more accurately, every Dell, Acer and Apple -- wants to get into the mobile phone/handset business.

Dell was rumored to be partnering with Google on a joint mobile-phone project, a rumor I correctly predicted was false. The PC maker was also rumored to be interested in buying Motorola. Despite the flimsy nature of the Dell handset rumors, the conventional wisdom is that the company may at some point enter the mobile phone handset business.

Acer, the third biggest PC maker in the world, is in the process of buying E-Ten Information Systems, a company that makes, among other things, Windows Mobile-based mobile phone handsets.

Apple, which originated as a computer hardware and software maker, rolled out the iPhone handset last year (after making it big in the media player market).

The handset market is already crowded with far too many phones. If the PC makers are really serious about entering the mobile phone market with distinctive products people might actually want, why not improve mobile phone "awareness" of computers, and visa versa?

Can't they all just get along?

While mobile phone handset makers roll out more and more functionality for phones, users are becoming increasingly ambivalent about all this "function overload." The reason is that it can be such a pain in the neck for our phones to interact with our PCs. Synchronization, file transfer and backup and other functions between devices isn't ready for prime time on most platforms, so most people just don't bother.

Many phones can, and all phones should, serve as mobile broadband modems for laptops. Yet most users don't take advantage.

PCs would benefit greatly from awareness about the location of the user. Is she sitting in front of me? Is she out of the building? Imagine if your PC performed routine maintenance, or kicked into security mode when it knew you weren't around. Since we take them wherever we go, mobile phones are ideal devices to inform our PCs whether we're in the room or not.

We like to set up our PCs just so, with color schemes and specific files and applications we like to use. Imagine if our phones could carry sets of configurations around and magically transform any PC we happen to be using into one set up just like the computer at home or in the office.

We work on documents, then go home and work on them some more. Why don't phones automatically carry the latest version and upload it to whichever PC we're using? Why do most of us still use e-mail for this?

The vision thing

Some visionaries are working on this problem.

One of the most interesting and promising projects in this area was developed by an unexpected source: The New York Times. The publishing company funds an R&D lab, apparently. Two of its researchers, Michael Young and Nick Bilton, developed a technology concept called SHIFD.

The original vision of SHIFD involved the use of RFID chips embedded in mobile phones. An RFID reader plugged into a PC informed SHIFD software that the user's mobile phone was nearby. This was a wonderful vision and enabled all kinds of useful functions. While the new SHIFD prototype is free software only and enables you to drop content on the Internet and access it from any PC or your phone, the old version used the mobile phone for location awareness. It was a superior vision that was abandoned because of a lack of hardware support.

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Mike Elgan

Computerworld
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