The top 10 reasons Web sites get hacked

Web developers ignore security flaws at customers' peril

5. Cross site request forgery

The problem: "Simple and devastating," this attack takes control of victim's browser when it is logged onto a Web site, and sends malicious requests to the Web application. Web sites are extremely vulnerable, partly because they tend to authorize requests based on session cookies or "remember me" functionality. Banks are potential targets.

"Ninety-nine percent of the applications on the Internet are susceptible to cross site request forgery," Williams says. "Has there been an actual exploit where someone's lost money? Probably the banks don't even know. To the bank, all it looks like is a legitimate transaction from a logged-in user."

Real-world example: A hacker known as Samy gained more than a million "friends" on MySpace.com with a worm in late 2005, automatically including the message "Samy is my hero" in thousands of MySpace pages. The attack itself may not have been that harmful, but it was said to demonstrate the power of combining cross site scripting with cross site request forgery. Another example that came to light one year ago exposed a Google vulnerability allowing outside sites to change a Google user's language preferences.

How to protect users: Don't rely on credentials or tokens automatically submitted by browsers. "The only solution is to use a custom token that the browser will not 'remember,'" OWASP writes.

6. Information leakage and improper error handling

The problem: Error messages that applications generate and display to users are useful to hackers when they violate privacy or unintentionally leak information about the program's configuration and internal workings.

"Web applications will often leak information about their internal state through detailed or debug error messages. Often, this information can be leveraged to launch or even automate more powerful attacks," OWASP says.

Real-world example: Information leakage goes well beyond error handling, applying also to breaches occurring when confidential data is left in plain sight. The ChoicePoint debacle in early 2005 thus falls somewhere in this category. The records of 163,000 consumers were compromised after criminals pretending to be legitimate ChoicePoint customers sought details about individuals listed in the company's database of personal information. ChoicePoint subsequently limited its sales of information products containing sensitive data.

How to protect users: Use a testing tool such as OWASP'S WebScarab Project to see what errors your application generates. "Applications that have not been tested in this way will almost certainly generate unexpected error output," OWASP writes.

Another tip: disable or limit detailed error handling, and don't display debug information to users.

7. Broken authentication and session management

The problem: User and administrative accounts can be hijacked when applications fail to protect credentials and session tokens from beginning to end. Watch out for privacy violations and the undermining of authorization and accountability controls.

"Flaws in the main authentication mechanism are not uncommon, but weaknesses are more often introduced through ancillary authentication functions such as logout, password management, timeout, remember me, secret question and account update," OWASP writes.

Real-world example: Microsoft had to eliminate a vulnerability in Hotmail that could have let malicious JavaScript programmers steal user passwords in 2002. Revealed by a networking products reseller, the flaw was vulnerable to e-mails containing Trojans that altered the Hotmail user interface, forcing users to repeatedly reenter their passwords and unwittingly send them to hackers.

How to protect users: Communication and credential storage has to be secure. The SSL protocol for transmitting private documents should be the only option for authenticated parts of the application, and credentials should be stored in hashed or encrypted form.

Another tip: get rid of custom cookies used for authentication or session management.

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Jon Brodkin

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