EA Games Battlefield: Bad Company

Battlefield: Bad Company marches onto next-gen consoles with unbelievably polished gameplay.

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 2
EA Games Battlefield: Bad Company
  • EA Games Battlefield: Bad Company
  • EA Games Battlefield: Bad Company
  • EA Games Battlefield: Bad Company

Pros

  • Non-stop, varied action on foot, behind a wheel or in the air; gorgeous, fully destructible environments; incredible attention to detail

Cons

  • Campaign slightly repetitive in spots; standard multiplayer modes not included

Bottom Line

Hold up your white flag and surrender to this fine, fine shooter.

Would you buy this?

  • Buy now (Selling at 2 stores)

See all prices

Dynamic action, tons of features, and highly detailed visuals come together for the first significant step forward of console first-person shooters since Halo: Combat Evolved. While there are a few minor quibbles, you're assured to become addicted to Battlefield: Bad Company's twitch gameplay.

Love is a battlefield

The unlikely story of Preston Marlowe fills the half dozen missions of the single player campaign. Part of a small four-man squad in the US Army's outcast regimen nicknamed 'Bad Company', Marlowe becomes embroiled in a crazy quest for mercenary gold. From being disavowed by the Army to joining arms with a mad dictator, the platoon's journey is equal parts hilarity and lethal action. Bad Company is a near perfect mix of weapons and wit, which is refreshing given the series' multiplayer roots.

Expansive, fully destructible levels set Bad Company apart from any other console first-person shooter. Shoot out a window or blast out a brick wall; lob a grenade at a concrete wall or call in a mortar strike onto a bridge — everything deforms realistically according to the amount of physical force applied. A semi-automatic rifle can't take out a bridge, but artillery sure does the trick. It's an impressive display of engineering, but what truly makes the destructibility so fantastic is how intimately it's tied to the action.

Method to the madness

The ability to wreak havoc at will hasn't been inserted for the sake of a bullet point on the back of the box; on the contrary, destructibility has real meaning, real impact on how you play the game. For example, a sniper camping out in an attic can be obliterated with a well-aimed rocket, eliminating the need to navigate through the building in search of the sniper's vantage point. Of course, you're welcome to climb into the attic if that's how you want to roll. You could also hop into a tank and just turn the entire structure into a pile of rubble.

The ability to dispatch enemies in so many unique ways comes as a result of sophisticated level design and a glut of weapons. Dozens of firearms have been painstakingly replicated for use in the game. A great number can only be equipped once you've found them within the single player campaign, which can be quite the undertaking. Along with bonus gold crates hidden within each mission, there's an enormous amount of content to locate and unlock.

The more the merrier

All of these finely tuned elements — the non-stop action, fully destructible environments, huge arsenal of weapons — transfer into multiplayer. A maximum of 24 players can join up for matches on half a dozen well-balanced maps. Right now, only one mode of play is available: Gold Rush. This objective-driven game splits players into two teams, one charged with defending gold caches against the other, which is tasked with blowing them up with explosives. It's intense, challenging and fresh. Conquest should have been included as a second mode, but you have to download it separately.

Aside from the unnecessary omission of Conquest mode from the disc, Bad Company does pretty much everything right. It sweet talks its way into your heart with visceral first-person combat and a sharp story, but it's the multiplayer that you'll cherish for years to come.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the Good Gear Guide comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?