Apple Mac OS X Lion

Mac OS X Lion review: a shock to the system

  • Review
  • Specs
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  • User Reviews (1)
  • Buy Now 5
Apple Mac OS X Lion
  • Apple Mac OS X Lion
  • Apple Mac OS X Lion
  • Expert Rating

    4.50 / 5
  • User Rating

    2.00 / 5 (of 1 Review)

Pros

  • Great price

Cons

  • Many features are different to Snow Leopard

Bottom Line

In the past, Apple has charged $129 for upgrades with far fewer improvements than this, and that price upgraded just a single system. At $30 for all the Macs in your world, the only reason not to upgrade to Lion is because you rely on old PowerPC-based apps that won’t run on it. Otherwise, it’s a more than fair price for a great upgrade.

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Scrolling and gesturing

Apple has been adding Multi-Touch gestures to OS X since the introduction of two-finger scrolling in the PowerBook in 2005. After the arrival of the iPhone in 2007, things really picked up steam. In 2008 MacBooks got a Multi-Touch glass trackpad, and in 2010 Apple brought the same gestures to the desktop with the Magic Trackpad. With Lion, Multi-Touch gestures are now front and center, and it'll be interesting to see how users react.

For some users, gestures are already second nature; I can't imagine using my MacBook without two-finger scrolling. As someone who uses the Desktop to store all of the files I'm currently working on, the four-finger flicking gesture that clears away all windows so I can see that Desktop is now burned into my muscle memory. (To do that in Lion, you now flick with three or four fingers and your thumb.)

But for others, gestures are completely foreign. When I mention two-finger scrolling to some people, they look at me like I'd just claimed that I'd been to the moon. (For the record: if you slide two fingers up and down on a trackpad, it's just like you were spinning a mouse's scroll wheel. Try it, it's great!)

It's true that gestures can be tricky to learn. Some feel natural, because the result mimics the gesture: the three- or four-finger flick that moves your windows out of the way and summons Mission Control; the three-finger sideways slide that moves you from one space to another; and the new four- or five-finger spread that reveals the Desktop. Others are less intuitive: the two-finger double-tap that provides an iPhone-like zoom, for example, or the double-tap with three fingers (not the triple-tap with two fingers) that produces a pop-up dictionary definition of any word onscreen. Nifty features both, but tough to remember.

Lion also dramatically changes the two-finger scroll. That's because Apple has decided to change directions: In previous versions of OS X, if you slid two fingers upwards on a trackpad (or moved the scrollbar on the side of the window up), your view of a document moved up; the document on the screen seemed to move down, and you would see content higher up on the page. In Lion, if you push those two fingers up, it's as if you're physically pushing the document up; you see the content below what had been onscreen.

Apple says that after a few days of using OS X with this new behavior, your brain adapts and then you won't be able go back to doing it the other way. It's true: After three or four days, I was comfortable with the new scrolling orientation. If you're willing to put up with a few days of weirdness, your mind will adapt. If you can't, well, go to the Scroll & Zoom tab in the Trackpad preference pane and uncheck the Scroll With Finger Direction option; that will restore the old scrolling behavior.

Users of desktop Macs who don't like trackpads will be grumpy about the change. Fortunately for them, you don't need a trackpad to use Lion; most of the features you implement via gestures can also be activated using keyboard shortcuts or contextual menus.

With this change, Apple is syncing the behavior between the iOS and the Mac. Is it really necessary for the two platforms to be in sync? Right now, I'd say no. But it does make me wonder whether Apple is laying the groundwork for more crossover between the two operating systems. If someday there's a touchscreen Mac or one that can run iOS apps natively, having a consistent scroll-direction philosophy will make sense. For now, though, if it hurts your brain too much, you can just turn it off.

Speaking of scrolling, scroll bars, and crossover between the Mac OS and iOS, Lion also introduces the biggest change to scroll bars since they were introduced with the original Mac in 1984. By default, scroll bars on Lion are invisible, just as they are in iOS. You see nothing on the right side of a document window until you begin to scroll with a trackpad or mouse. Only then does the scroll bar appear. When it does, it's clickable and draggable; you can even move your cursor above or below the bar itself and click in a light-gray scroll lane to jump rapidly through a document. But when not in use, the scrollbar fades away.

As someone who has fully embraced the concept of scrolling via two fingers on a trackpad, I like this approach--I didn't use that scroll bar space and generally don't need to see it. But as with so many of the changes Apple is making in Lion, the company gives users who like the old way an out: In the General pane of the System Preferences app, there's an option to always show scroll bars. If you like to click on those arrow buttons at the top and/or bottom of the old scrollbars, though, you're out of luck: They're gone completely. I can't remember the last time I used them, so that doesn't bother me.

Mission Control

Over Mac OS X's lifetime, Apple has introduced several ways for users to cope with window clutter--the problem of having too many documents and apps open on the screen at the same time. Exposé, which lets you quickly see all of your currently open windows, was introduced in 2003 with Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther). Dashboard, that separate onscreen space for tiny widget apps, appeared in 2005 with Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger). Spaces, which let you assign apps to multiple virtual desktops, arrived in 2007 as a part of Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard).

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ken

2.0

1

Pros
lion
Cons
lion
• • •

It would be a great os if...Apple would resolve the wireless connectivity issue..still fighting connectivity since upgrade - search on lion connectivity - I am not alone..

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