Acer Liquid smartphone

The Acer Liquid is a touchscreen smartphone equipped with Google Android 1.6

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 1
Acer Liquid

Pros

  • Reasonably speedy

Cons

  • Touchscreen is not as responsive as it should be

Bottom Line

It's a long step forward from the Acer S200 neoTouch - but the Liquid trails behind slightly more polished examples of Android, such as Google's own Nexus One. Which in turn means the Acer Liquid is a some way behind the iPhone in sheer usability. It may appeal if you can find one at a bargain price and prefer Google's user limitations over Apple's.

Would you buy this?

  • Price

    TBA (AUD)
  • Buy now (Selling at 1 store)

Measured by the yardstick of usability, Acer's first foray into mobile phones late last year was not a success. Acer hobbled its first phones with the enduringly inept Windows Mobile operating system, now in its six-and-a-half incarnation, and even some fast and sexy 1GHz Snapdragon silicon couldn't save the Acer neoTouch S200 from its user-hostile stylus interface.

So news of Acer re-embracing Linux for its follow-up smartphone - albeit by simply jumping on the Google Android bandwagon - had us hoping there'd be a good chance of alighting upon a more usable Acer smartphone. And the Acer Liquid, also know as the A1 or S100, is certainly more approachable than its WinMo country cousin.

The shape and colour will appeal to the original iPod crowd, all white plastic and palm-friendly rounded edges, only more toy-like. At 115mm high and 13mm thick, it slips in the pocket quite easily and its light 133g weight shouldn't upset either.

To access the Acer Liquid's removable battery, SIM slot and microSD card you must wrench off the backplate by confidently ripping backward with your fingernails from the correct end. Once snapped back together again, only the occasional squeak under pressure reminds you it's not a sealed unit.

The Acer Liquid can be reasonably nippy running Google Android 1.6, even if its Snapdragon processor, the same again as used in the Acer neoTouch, has been underclocked to 768MHz; presumably in a bid to stretch battery life.

It's still no endurance champion though, lasting less than two days between charges. And ultimately, its interface still feels slower than even the Samsung Galaxy, an older Android phone.

The screen is bright if not as colourful as the best-of-breed, and capacitive touch control means you need to apply too much heavy pressure to make yourself understood. We're not sure of the Acer Liquid screen's material, but it feels plasticky and certainly isn't as silky to the touch as the iPhone's glass screen.

Worse, screen buttons occasionally need re-prodding before they respond. That's simply infuriating when the button in question is Call Answer. Or crack-of-dawn Alarm Off.

Rapid txt and email typing can also be slowed by this insensitivity, not helped by the less than gifted touch intelligence of what is still an immature operating system from Google.

With no multitouch control, basic operations like web page zooming are slower than on more sophisticated phones. Subtle haptic vibration on button presses gives useful tactile feedback though.

Hardware buttons on each side control unlock (left) and ringer volume up/down (right) but the way the phone falls into the hand, we found we'd be changing volume in the process of unlocking.

Call quality was good with enough volume through the earpiece for comfortable voice calls. Sound quality through the little speaker, used for ringtones and alarms was quite poor though.

Other features include a 5Mp camera that also shoots usable stills but less-impressive video with rather noisy sound. There's also GPS, and some discreet indicators of new messages, missed call and battery life, seen as backlit tell-tales on the phone's top edge.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Read more on these topics: mobile phones, smartphones, Google Android

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the Good Gear Guide comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?