Oculus teases a standalone Rift headset that blends the best of PC and mobile VR

It's like the Vive, but without the tethers. Or the PC.

The dream: A virtual reality headset that can track and react to where you are in the world, without base stations or tethers. And today, at its third Oculus Connect conference, Oculus teased just that—a short, ten-second clip of a self-contained prototype headset, complete with position-tracking.

That could be huge for VR. Currently, the only inside-out headset on the market is the HTC Vive, which relies on its two Lighthouse base stations to blast an area with lasers, which are then analyzed by the headset to discern the user's position. But the Vive's tether? Thick, stiff, and a hassle. And it only works in a specific area.

Samsung's Gear VR (partnered with Oculus) is tetherless, by comparison. You can take it anywhere—but it can only track movement around a point, not track a user's motion through space.

Oculus's goal is to combine the two. And they're not alone—the Sulon Q, for instance, is a VR headset with a full-blown AMD APU inside. This vision of the future eliminates VR's need for a high-powered gaming PC—an evolution that’s pretty much essential if the platform's ever going to hit critical mass and become the social tool Facebook wants it to be.

It's still early days though, as Mark Zuckerberg quickly cautioned. Oculus showed an incredibly brief target video of what Oculus is working on, which looked like a Rift with extra hardware built into a section on the rear headstrap—not proof of an incoming announcement. Maybe at the next Oculus Connect…

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags OculusVRVR

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Hayden Dingman

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?