Microsoft continues embracing Linux with new Azure certification

Redmond really does love Linux

In a partnership that would have seemed most unlikely back when Microsoft railed against open source, the software company has teamed with the Linux Foundation to offer a certification for managing Linux systems in the Azure cloud.

The new Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate Linux on Azure certification allows people to show that they have invested time in developing skills to run Linux servers in Microsoft's cloud. It's something of a surprising move, considering that Azure didn't even support Linux virtual machines four years ago, but meshes with Microsoft's current strategy of embracing open source technologies.

In order to acquire the certification, a candidate has to pass the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator exam and the Implementing Microsoft Azure Infrastructure Solutions exam. Once they've done that, they can apply for the certification. Neither of those exams are new, but the resulting certification is.

That's good news for people who have already passed one or both exams. Existing passes still count towards the certification, so people who have passed both exams just have to contact Microsoft about acquiring their certification. 

Those folks who haven't yet passed the exams will have to shell out several hundred dollars just to take the tests. Depending on their level of skill, certification seekers may want to undertake additional training to prepare for the tests, which will cost more money. 

Wednesday's news is yet another sign of Microsoft's commitment to running Linux workloads on Azure.

According to John Shewchuk, a technical fellow at Microsoft, more than half of the images companies can deploy from the Azure Marketplace use Linux, rather than Microsoft's technologies. It's something he says is emblematic of Microsoft's approach to Linux, especially under its new CEO, Satya Nadella.  

"So now, to have half the Marketplace be Linux workloads, and to be doing work like this to get people certified, it really does represent a sea change in the engagement model [for Microsoft]," Shewchuk said in an interview. "And it's clear that Satya has been at the core of much of this change."

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Microsoft

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Blair Hanley Frank

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?