Google's container management service exits beta, gets uptime guarantee

Google has made it official. It is now offering the Google Container Service as a commercial service, allowing customers run full micro-services architecture on the Google Cloud

Google is the latest cloud service provider to rally behind containers, an emerging type of virtualization technology that adherents claim can streamline the process of running workloads in the cloud.

Google is now offering a container management service, called the Google Container Engine, for production workloads. This sets the stage for businesses to run their most important applications within containers on the Google Cloud Platform.

A growing number of organizations use containers as a way to build applications that can be easily scaled, duplicated and upgraded. The new service provides a way to manage large numbers of containers, eliminating a lot of the low-level work of orchestrating operations involving many containers.

Google first launched the container engine in November 2014, as a preview release. With this commercial release, Google guarantees that the service is ready for production workloads, promising a 99.95 percent uptime.

Pricing has also been set. Use is free for up to 6 nodes. Managing more than 6 nodes costs $0.015 per hour per cluster.

Google itself has been using containers to run its own Internet services, such as search and e-mail.

Using containers, organizations can build their applications in a modular fashion, with each component holding a piece of the application -- a practice known as a micro-services architecture. When the application needs to be updated, a new container can be easily swapped in, minimizing the impact in operations.

Containers also set the stage for the DevOps style of software development, in which developers quickly iterate while creating a software program, by packaging it in containers so individual components can be easily and frequently tested.

With the service, users can deploy a complex application, involving multiple containers, as a single operation. The Google Container Engine also logs operations and ensures each of the containers is running properly, as well as provides an easy way to resize a cluster by adding additional processing or memory.

Startup company Porch, which provides a listing service to find home improvement professionals, found that using a container-based approach on Google requires only about 40 percent of the resources that would be required using other cloud-based services, according to a blog post announcing the release.

The container-based architecture also allows organizations to move their applications between in-house deployments and cloud services, or between two cloud services. Microsoft, IBM, Red Hat, and VMware all offer container-management technologies with their services and enterprise software stacks.

The Google Container Engine is based on Kubernetes, a container management software developed by Google and released as open source.

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Google

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Joab Jackson

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Father’s Day Gift Guide

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?