Panasonic to make some IoT technologies royalty-free

The company wants to help foster new development in IoT

Panasonic is contributing some of its own software and patents to the cause of making the Internet of Things work.

The company's North American arm will provide royalty-free access to some IoT software and patents from its products, hoping to foster development of new IoT software and services. While machine-to-machine connections are nothing new, IoT is intended to allow more things to talk to each other and more applications to run over the networks that link those things.

Panasonic, best known for consumer electronics, has been selling IoT hardware and software for years in both consumer and industrial settings, especially in North America, said Todd Rytting, CTO of Panasonic Corp. of North America. Opening up some of its technology will help developers find new ways to make it work with other IoT components in widely supported implementations, he said.

The company is contributing this intellectual property to the OpenDOF Project, a non-profit group created by Panasonic but open to anyone. Panasonic formed OpenDOF, which stands for Open Distributed Object Framework, to drive development of network services for devices with limited resources such as power and memory.

There are many different networks and protocols in IoT, which spans a wide range of industries. That will always be true, so there will have to be bridges between them, Rytting said. That's part of what OpenDOF will try to achieve.

Panasonic is also stepping up its work with the AllSeen Alliance, one of the major groups working on ways to connect IoT devices and services. It will participate in AllSeen's working group for gateways, which link local IoT networks with the Internet. Gateways can take the form of dedicated boxes or of functions built into appliances such as set-top boxes or TVs.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Internet of ThingsPanasonicinternet

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Stephen Lawson

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles


GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy


First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni


For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell


The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi


The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott


My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?