Apple ordered to pay Texas company $532.9 million after losing patent case

Apple will appeal the verdict and called for patent reform to end lawsuits from companies that don't make products

Apple has been ordered to pay US$532.9 million after a U.S. jury found that its iTunes software infringed three patents owned by Smartflash, a Texas-based technology licensing company.

That figure is less than the $852 million that Smartflash was seeking, but is still a blow to Apple. Smartflash said it was entitled to a percentage of sales from Apple devices like Mac computers, iPhones and iPads that were used to access iTunes.

Apple tried to have the case thrown out, saying that it never used Smartflash's technology. Apple also argued the patents in question are invalid because previous patented innovations from other companies covered the same technology.

Apple will appeal the verdict and called for patent reform to curtail lawsuits from companies that don't manufacture products themselves.

"We refused to pay off this company for the ideas our employees spent years innovating and unfortunately we have been left with no choice but to take this fight up through the court system," Apple said in a statement. Apple didn't immediately reply to a request for further comment.

Smartflash sued Apple in May 2013 in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern Division of Texas, alleging that iTunes software infringed on its patents related to serving data and managing access to data.

"Smartflash is very pleased with the jury's verdict in this case confirming that Apple devices designed to use the Apple iTunes Store and App Store infringe Smartflash's patents. Ultimately, the jury saw through Apple's arguments and reached the right result," said Brad Caldwell, a lawyer for Smartflash, in an emailed statement.

Apple gained knowledge of the Smartflash technology in question more than a decade ago, the complaint alleges. In 2000, Patrick Racz, one of the technology's co-inventors, met with executives at what is now digital security company Gemalto. One of those executives, Augustin Farrugia, went on to become a senior director at Apple. This sequence of events shows willful infringement, Smartflash claimed.

Smartflash doesn't make any products, according to its website. Instead, the company licenses seven patents Racz co-created for "data storage and access systems technology." Smartflash said its technology is used in smartphones, netbooks, gaming consoles and set top boxes, among many other devices. The company is located in Tyler, Texas, two blocks from the courthouse where the trial was held.

Smartflash has also filed patent infringement cases against HTC, Google and Samsung.

Fred O'Connor writes about IT careers and health IT for The IDG News Service. Follow Fred on Twitter at @fredjoconnor. Fred's e-mail address is fred_o'connor@idg.com

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Appleintellectual propertylegalpatentSmartflash

Our Back to Business guide highlights the best products for you to boost your productivity at home, on the road, at the office, or in the classroom.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Fred O'Connor

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Crucial Ballistix Elite 32GB Kit (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 UDIMM

Learn more >

Gadgets & Things

Lexar® Professional 1000x microSDHC™/microSDXC™ UHS-II cards

Learn more >

Family Friendly

Lexar® JumpDrive® S57 USB 3.0 flash drive 

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Plox Star Wars Death Star Levitating Bluetooth Speaker

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Featured Content

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?