Facebook doubles reward for bug reports in advertising code

Facebook will pay a minimum of US$1,000 for a valid ads-related vulnerability through December

Facebook is doubling the rewards it will pay for security vulnerabilities related to code that runs its advertising system, the company said Wednesday.

A comprehensive security audit of its ads code was recently completed, but Facebook "would like to encourage additional scrutiny from whitehats to see what we may have missed," wrote Collin Greene, a security engineer, in a blog post. "Whitehats" refers to ethical security researchers, as opposed to "blackhats" who take advantage of vulnerabilities.

According to bug bounty program guidelines, Facebook pays a minimum of US$500 for a valid bug report. Until the end of the year, that has been increased to $1,000.

Greene wrote that the majority of reports it receives concern more common parts of Facebook's code, but the company would like to encourage interest in ads "to better protect businesses."

Facebook's ad tools include the Ads Manager, the ads API (application programming interface) and Analytics, which is also called Insights, Greene wrote. The company also wants close scrutiny of its back-end billing code.

"There is a lot of backend code to correctly target, deliver, bill and measure ads," Greene wrote. "This code isn't directly reachable via the website, but of the small number of issues that have been found in these areas, they are relatively high impact."

Greene wrote that Facebook typically sees bugs such as incorrect permission checks, insufficient rate-limiting, edge-case CSRF (cross-site request forgery) issues and problems with Flash in its ads code.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

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Jeremy Kirk

IDG News Service
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