Epson has lasers in its crosshairs with new PrecisionCore inkjet technology

PrecisionCore-based devices to be sold by big-name distributors

New Epson A3 Workforce WF-7620 with PrecisionCore technology.

New Epson A3 Workforce WF-7620 with PrecisionCore technology.

Epson has launched its PrecisionCore inkjet technology in Australia and claims the technology poses a major threat to the laser printing industry.

The vendor is making some bold promises; Australian managing director, Bruno Turcato, claims PrecisionCore will beat laser printers in the same price range and class in quality, performance, colour resolution, cost, and power consumption.

Turcato also said that due to its scalability, PrecisionCore can be utilised in commercial printers right down to everyday compact small office and home office (SOHO) devices.

PrecisionCore uses a PrecisionCore MicroTFP print chip which is based on the thin film piezo (TFP) technology normally found in the vendor's large-format printers.

The chip is modular and can be built into various printhead configurations.

Read more: The paperless office is not here yet: Oki

The company considers PrecisionCore the evolution of its Micro Piezo proprietary piezoelectric inkjet printhead developed by current president, Minoru Usui in the early 1980s.

According to a statement from Epson, the TFP actuators act as pumps which produce droplets of ink that are one micron thick (about one per cent of a human hair).

PrecisionCore is capable of controlling the droplet shape and volume at a rate of up to 50,000 times per second per nozzle.

Printers which currently contain PrecisionCore include the WorkForce 3600 and 7600 series and the Workforce Pro 4600 series.

Epson will launch its Workforce Pro WF-5190 and WF-5690 printers in June which will also feature PrecisionCore.

The local distributors which will sell PrecisionCore-based printers include Ingram Micro, Synnex, Alloys, XIT, BMS, and Leader.

Read More:

Tags hardwarePrecisionCoreproductPrintersimagingEpsonprintingprint

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Nermin Bajric

1 Comment

IT_Observer

1

I doubt this technology will be a treat to the Laser printer manufacturers.
Inkjet printers are dirty cheap, but in the long run cost more when constantly replacing the consumables.
In the other hand, Laser is far more cheaper for an office to produce a lot of printed text documents, colour prints still can't rival the quality output of inkjet.
Also, take into consideration that using an inkjet printer, the printed material will fade with time whereas laser can long last.

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