Ukraine tensions could hurt international security efforts, Kaspersky says

Anything that hurts trust between countries sets back global Internet efforts, the cybersecurity pioneer said

Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and CEO of Kaspersky Lab, spoke on Tuesday at a Kaspersky conference in San Francisco.

Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and CEO of Kaspersky Lab, spoke on Tuesday at a Kaspersky conference in San Francisco.

International conflicts such as the current tensions over Ukraine could stand in the way of global cooperation on cybersecurity, according to the founder of Kaspersky Lab.

"Governments must cooperate, and I'm afraid that what's going on ... well, it doesn't help," said Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and CEO of the security research and technology company that bears his name. He spoke on Tuesday at a Kaspersky conference in San Francisco that highlighted the importance of cooperation and information-sharing to combat cyber threats.

Anything that decreases trust among governments can hurt such efforts, Kaspersky added. Last year's Edward Snowden affair, in which the former National Security Agency contractor revealed evidence that the U.S. spied on foreign leaders, also hurt international trust, Kaspersky said.

"It will damage global Internet projects," he said. "Nations will be more focused on the national projects. That's good news for the local IT companies, but ... the evolution of cyberspace will slow down."

On Tuesday, Ukrainian troops clashed with pro-Russian insurgents in eastern Ukraine. The fighting came just weeks after the conflict in Crimea, which led to Crimea seceding from Ukraine. In response, the U.S. government imposed sanctions against Russia and cut back on some joint efforts with the country, including space programs.

Kaspersky Lab, founded and based in Russia, still does most of its research in Moscow but is an international company, Kaspersky said. As a cybersecurity company, it remains neutral in all political issues, other than abiding by international sanctions against pariah states such as Iran and North Korea, he said.

The company has a regional headquarters in Ukraine, but the conflict there has not hurt its business in any part of the world, Kaspersky said.

"We keep our distance and we are hoping that this situation will be fixed soon and in a peaceful way," he said.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is stephen_lawson@idg.com

Tags Government use of ITsecuritygovernmentkaspersky lab

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Stephen Lawson

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?