UK man charged with hacking US Federal Reserve

The defendant is accused of stealing personal information of employees and publishing it on a website

A British man faces new charges in the U.S. for allegedly hacking into the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank's servers and stealing names, email addresses and other personal information of the bank's computer users.

Lauri Love, already facing charges in New Jersey and Virginia, is now charged with one count of computer hacking and one count of aggravated identity theft in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, said Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney there.

Documents charging Love in New York were unsealed Thursday.

"Lauri Love is a sophisticated hacker who broke into Federal Reserve computers, stole sensitive personal information, and made it widely available, leaving people vulnerable to malicious use of that information," Bharara said in a statement. "We place a high priority on the investigation and prosecution of hackers who intrude into our infrastructure and threaten the personal security of our citizens."

It was unclear who is representing Love in the U.S. cases.

Love used a SQL attack to infiltrate the bank's servers, according to a press release. In late December 2012, Love told other hackers in an IRC chat room that he had gained control of the server for the Federal Reserve Bank in Chicago, according to the indictment in New York. He also gained access to a Federal Reserve Bank server in New York, the U.S. Department of Justice alleged.

In later IRC chat sessions, Love told other hackers he had gained personal information of Federal Reserve employees and intended to make it public, the indictment alleges.

Love posted some personal information on a compromised website, according to Bharara's office.

The computer hacking carries a maximum term of 10 years in prison and the aggravated identity theft carries an additional sentence of two years in prison.

Love and coconspirators compromised several U.S. agencies, including NASA, the U.S. Defense Department's Missile Defense Agency, the U.S. Army's Network Enterprise Technology Command and the Environmental Protection Agency, according to the charges in New Jersey.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's email address is grant_gross@idg.com.

Tags U.S. Department of JusticeU.S. Federal Reserve Banksecuritylegaldata breachLauri LovegovernmentcybercrimePreet BhararaU.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Grant Gross

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?