ThoughtSpot promises Google-like BI experience

The startup has developed an in-memory database and BI appliance

Two items on BI (business intelligence) customers' wish lists have long been ease of use and a lower burden on IT. A startup called ThoughtSpot says its new BI appliance can tackle both.

ThoughtSpot has developed an in-memory database for the appliance. This allows information to be held in RAM for faster processing of queries, which users enter in natural language through a Google-like form.

The system relies on the use of structured data sets, in part because ThoughtSpot also provides computations along with retrieving results of queries, said CEO Ajeet Singh.

He demonstrated how ThoughtSpot works using a .CSV file of information on startups from Crunchbase. Singh was able to enter queries that not only brought back subsets of data, such as funding rounds, but also totaled up figures on the fly.

The company is aiming at midsized to large enterprises, which have a variety of structured information sources, such as existing data warehouses and enterprise applications. Customers who buy ThoughtSpot appliances will still have to have their IT departments push data into the system and set up user permissions, but would no longer need to build out reports and dashboards for users given ThoughtSpot's self-service interface, Singh said.

This is the way BI should be, he added. "Imagine if you had to go to a Google engineer to get every [search engine] query built," he said.

While many other vendors are focused on self-service BI, ThoughtSpot's emphasis on a search engine-like experience is a differentiator, according to Singh.

ThoughtSpot's appliance is built with commodity hardware, with configurations starting at four servers. More appliances can be added for scalability. The system uses traditional disk to provide a persistence layer and data backup in the event of a failure.

While a hosted version is on ThoughtSpot's road map, for now it sees demand primarily for on-premises installations, Singh said. Part of the problem with a cloud-based BI service is simply the task of moving terabyte-sized data sets in and out of the system, he added.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Tags GoogleapplicationsThoughtSpotcontent managementsoftwaredata miningbusiness intelligencedata warehousing

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?