China to tighten hold on Internet, citing worries about nation's stability

In recent months, China has been cracking down on Internet users for spreading rumors

China is moving to tighten its grip over social networking services even more, citing possible threats to stability.

On Friday, Chinese authorities released a new blueprint for the country's future that covered economic and social reforms including loosening the nation's decades old one-child policy. But in the online space, the government showed no signs of shifting gears in its vast censorship of the Internet.

The government instead pointed to problems with its existing system to manage the flow of online information. Currently, there are too many different overseeing departments, resulting in inconsistencies and a lack of efficiency, the government said in a posting, explaining the reforms.

"At the same time, due to the rise of online media, the Internet regulatory systems that manage the media and the industry are falling far behind to catch up with the new changes," the post stated.

The government referred to the growing popularity of Chinese social networking and instant messaging tools as a major worry. The services can rapidly disseminate information and mobilize society, the posting said.

The authorities specifically mentioned Weixin, a mobile chatting app developed by local Internet giant Tencent. The app has taken China by storm, and boasts over 200 million monthly average users. Outside of the country, the app is better known as WeChat.

To make the Internet "more secure," China plans to bolster its regulatory systems, and increase the scope of their legal authority, the government said without offering further details.

China has already gained notoriety for its strict censorship of the Internet, and has blocked foreign sites such as YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. Local social networking services, however, continue to operate, but self-censor content by sometimes deleting politically sensitive or anti-government posts.

Despite that, in recent months Chinese authorities have been cracking down on Internet users for allegedly fabricating rumors online. In September, China said it would hand out jail sentences to users found guilty.

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Internet-based applications and servicesGovernment of Chinaregulationsocial networkinginternetsocial mediagovernment

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Michael Kan

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?