Nokia N9: Why you shouldn't buy this device

The phone runs Meego, an obsolete OS when compared with Android and iOS, and one that's destined to be phased out.

Nokia has unveiled the N9, its latest flagship smartphone, the first device to run the Meego operating system. Meego has been heralded as Nokia's strategic move against increased competition from rivals Apple and Google.

The N9 looks like one of Nokia's finest works to date: it has a 3.9-inch AMOLED display (854 by 480 pixels resolution), which is made from scratch-resistant curved glass, with no buttons on the face of the phone; the body is made out of polycarbonate, which Nokia claims will help with reception issues. There's also an 8-megapixel camera on board and NFC capabilities.

Techworld Australia feature: Nokia N9 vs. iPhone 4

But hardware is not the N9's problem - it's the software. The phone runs on the latest iteration of Meego (even though it's not mentioned anywhere on the promotional site), which Nokia developed as a response to Apple's iPhone and the Android army. But the problem is Meego is obsolete, even before the N9 goes on sale.

Earlier this year Nokia, under new management, realized it was standing on a "burning platform." Symbian and Meego, Nokia's smartphone operating systems, were too expensive to maintain and they were years behind competitors' sleekness and usability. Nokia's new CEO realized this and decided to strike a deal with Microsoft and put Windows Phone 7 on its top smartphones.

The first Nokia Windows Phone 7 devices are set to arrive later this year, while Symbian and Meego phones will be slowly abandoned over the coming months (or relegated to cheaper feature phones). It makes little sense to buy the N9, with an OS soon to be put to pastures, regardless of Nokia's excellent craftsmanship when it comes to hardware. If you really want a Nokia phone, you are better off waiting until later this year for one of the Windows Phone 7 models.

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Daniel Ionescu

PC World (US online)
Topics: consumer electronics, mobile phones, windows phone 7, Phones, Nokia, smartphones

Comments

Kimble

1

This is Nokia's smart phone OS of the future. Windows Phone 7 is nothing but a lame duck and an attempt by Nokia to once again get into the US market. For the rest of us there needs to be a next generation smart phone OS to compete with your beige box IOS and Android clones.

No one has ever said it was dead, why would Nokia put so much effort into this when they could have just launched a WP7 phone? It's because they want a differentiated future of their own not to be yet another Samsung or HTC churning out hundreds of clones.

This article goes to show the author should definitely not be working in this industry. A job in entertainment reporting would be better. They love rumours and unsubstantiated stabs.

Jonas Lihnell

2

Actually, since there is a multitude of large companies working on meego there will be app, updates and service, even if nokia is not up to the task.

Considering the names I've read to be among these, EA Mobile (games development for a 'dead' platform?), BMW (you think these folks would be satisfied with a half-baked low-quality platform?), ACER and Asus which both produce computers of varying form-factors.

Meego has a future, the N9 is application compatible and where nokia chooses to go in this regard is nothing but a drop in the sea. They are first, they probably won't be the last, to make a meego smartphone.

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