IBM pioneers graphene-based integrated circuits

IBM graphene circuits could one day provide the basis for secure wireless devices and low-cost displays

IBM has made what it claims is the first graphene-based integrated circuit, using many of the same techniques now used to produce silicon circuits. The technique could one day be used to produce superior wireless communication devices and less-expensive displays.

"We've been working on graphene high-frequency transistors for a while, so we took the natural next step to try to make integrated circuits," said Phaedon Avouris, an IBM fellow who led the project. "The challenge has been how to propagate integrated circuits on graphene, which has different characteristics than semiconductors such as silicon."

The researchers published their technique in this week's issue of Science.

The circuit that IBM built, a broadband frequency mixer, can operate at frequencies of up to 10GHz, or 10 billion cycles per second. The mixer can convert a wavelength of a higher frequency into a lower one. The circuit consists of a graphene transistor and a pair of inductors integrated on a silicon carbide (SiC) wafer.

Graphene is an ultrathin material consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb structure. The material has excellent electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Until now, however, it has been difficult to fuse graphene transistors with other materials, such as silicon. Manufacturing techniques are still quite primitive as well.

Today's silicon-based circuits can scale to only about 40GHz, Avouris said. So circuits that can handle wavelengths of 10GHz could enhance a wide variety of electronic devices. They could be used in military wireless communications devices, providing a basis for short-range, ultra-secure communications that would be much more difficult to decrypt. In radar, the higher frequencies that graphene offers could be used to enhance the resolution of objects being tracked.

And because of its ultra-thin nature, graphene could be embedded into glass panels, providing the basis for low-cost, high-resolution television or phone screens.

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, known as DARPA, helped fund the work.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags popular scienceIBMComponentsprocessors

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Joab Jackson

IDG News Service

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?