Microsoft claims cloud computing does cut carbon emissions

Accenture study demonstrates cloud is good

The thorny question of carbon emissions from cloud computing has raised its head again. There's been plenty of debate as to whether cloud computing is good or bad at curbing carbon emissions.

This time, cloud is good for the environment with Microsoft making the claim that cloud technology can shave 30 per cent off carbon emissions per user. Earlier this year, Greenpeace claimed that cloud was more harmful to the environment, a view backed up by Australian researchers two months ago.

Microsoft has got some heavyweight backing for its view. A survey carried out by Accenture ccenture and WSP Environment & Energy, looked at three widely-deployed and commonly-used Microsoft applications for email, content sharing and customer relationship management within cloud-based data centres and within corporate environments.

Cloud computing and the new normal

The Accenture study examined the carbon footprint of server, networking and storage infrastructure for three different deployment sizes (100, 1,000 and 10,000 users, and found that the smaller the organisation, the larger the benefit of switching to the cloud.

"The study's findings confirm what many organisations have already discovered: Cloud computing is more economical and IT resources are used more efficiently when business applications run in a shared environment. That's because, among other benefits, cloud computing delivers multiple efficiencies, which contribute to the reduction of energy consumption per unit of work, thereby helping to significantly reduce carbon emissions," said James Harris, Accenture's director of cloud services.

Read about Clouds push by Microsoft to small and large businesses

Sign up to receive Computerworld's newsletters via email.

Tags Configuration / maintenanceGreen data centerMicrosofthardware systemsgreen ITData Centreenvironment

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Maxwell Cooter

Techworld

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?