Stuxnet code hints at possible Israeli origin, researchers say

But they warn that misdirection is a common hacker tactic

Security researchers today offered another tantalizing clue about the possible origins of the notorious Stuxnet worm, but cautioned against reading too much from the obscure tea leaves.

In a paper released today and presented at a Vancouver, British Columbia security conference, a trio of Symantec researchers noted that Stuxnet includes references in its code to the 1979 execution of a prominent Jewish Iranian businessman.

Buried in Stuxnet's code is a marker with the digits "19790509" that the researchers believe is a "do-not infect" indicator. If the marker equals that value, Stuxnet stops in its tracks, and does not infect the targeted PC.

The researchers -- Nicolas Falliere, Liam O Murchu and Eric Chen -- speculated that the marker represents a date: May 9, 1979.

"While on May 9, 1979, a variety of historical events occurred, according to Wikipedia "Habib Elghanian was executed by a firing squad in Tehran sending shock waves through the closely knit Iranian Jewish community," the researchers wrote.

Elghanian, a prominent Jewish-Iranian businessman, was charged with spying for Israel by the then-new revolutionary government of Iran, and executed May 9, 1979.

According to a contemporary account in Time magazine, Elghanian was the first Jewish Iranian to be executed by the revolutionary government, which seized power after the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, fled the country in January 1979.

"Elghanian, who was convicted of spying for Israel, was said to have made huge investments in Israel and to have solicited funds for the Israeli army, which the prosecution claimed made him an accomplice 'in murderous air raids against innocent Palestinians,'" reported Time.

But Falliere, O Murchu and Chen warned against jumping to the natural conclusion, that the reference pointed to Israel as the origin of Stuxnet. "Attackers would have the natural desire to implicate another party," they said.

Researchers at Symantec, Kaspersky Lab and elsewhere have been pulling apart Stuxnet since it made a public splash in July in attempts to understand how it works and who might have created the worm.

Stuxnet, which has been dubbed the world's most sophisticated malware ever by O Murchu and others, targets Windows PCs that oversee industrial-control systems, called "SCADA" systems, that in turn manage and monitor machinery in power plants, factories, pipelines and military installations.

Stuxnet's complex design and SCADA target has led many to conclude that it was the work of a state-backed group of hackers, while massive infections in Iran hinted that that country's infrastructure, possibly its nuclear facilities, was the intended target.

Last weekend, Iranian officials confirmed that tens of thousands of PCs in their country had been infected by Stuxnet, including some used at a nuclear power plant in southwestern Iran that's planned to go online next month.

The Symantec researchers also revealed a host of other Stuxnet details in their paper, including a "kill date" of June 24, 2012, after which the worm will refuse to execute.

Tags symantecsecurityWindowssoftwareoperating systems

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Gregg Keizer

Computerworld (US)

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?