Intel: Gadgets to learn users' daily habits

The future of computing lies in devices that are not only smarter but also more aware of the habits and day-to-day lives of their users, says Justin Rattner, Intel Corp.'s chief technology officer.

The future of computing lies in devices that are not only smarter but also more aware of the habits and day-to-day lives of their users, says Justin Rattner, Intel Corp.'s chief technology officer .

At the annual Intel Developer Forum earlier this month, Rattner said the computing devices of the future will be context-aware and will able to act as personal aides.

"Future devices will constantly learn your habits, the way you go throughout your day. They'll understand your friends and how you're feeling. Maybe more importantly, they'll know where you're going and anticipate your needs," he said.

Within five years, smartphones will be aware of the information on a user's laptop, desktop and tablet systems, and will use that knowledge to help guide users through their daily activities, Rattner said.

For example, a smartphone could let a user know when there's a shoe sale at a local store, notify him about traffic jams or inform him that rain is forecast.

Intel demonstrated a prototype context-aware smartphone application that guides users as they tour a new city, suggesting activities and restaurants in the neighborhoods they pass through.

This version of this story was originally published in Computerworld's print edition. It was adapted from a version that appeared earlier on Computerworld.com.

Read more about mobile apps and services in Computerworld's Mobile Apps and Services Topic Center.

Tags Mobile Apps and ServicesMobile and Wirelesse-commercetelecommunicationinternetintelmobile

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Sharon Gaudin

Computerworld (US)

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