The what and why of Google's transparency report

Google now provides a report on how governments interfere with its services. Here's what it shows and what you can do with it

Google has unveiled its Google Transparency Report, the company's latest effort to stick to its "don't be evil" mission statement. The new site helps users differentiate between regular Google downtime and service interruptions caused by government interference, but that's just some of what the site can do.

In addition to differentiating between normal and "government-induced" service outages, the report's Government Requests page breaks down the numbers on government takedown requests for each country in the form of a handy Google Map. Clicking on an individual country further breaks down the data, providing takedown stats for individual Google services as well as compliance stats and how many takedowns were court-ordered.

The site also has a traffic section that provides data on the usage of each Google service in various countries over time. Google hopes that this tool will help show "disruptions in the free flow of data," but in its current form the traffic charts don't differentiate between a government-induced takedown and a drop in traffic caused by a random dip in interest, which limits this tool's usefulness. Google has said, however, that it plan to continue working on how to best present the data in the Transparency Report.

Perhaps the easiest way to understand the new site is to view it as a global extension of Google's earlier Mainland China Availability Chart, extending Google's method of displaying data on the Chinese government's interference to the rest of the world. Google seems to have high hopes that the site will similarly help expand the fight against net censorship.

The Transparency Report homepage includes a statement on Google's commitment to fighting web censorship that says at one point, "We hope this step toward greater transparency will help in ongoing discussions about the appropriate scope and authority of government requests."

Tags GoogleConsumer Adviceinternetgovernmentsearch engines

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

David Daw

PC World (US online)

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?