Smart phone shipments to grow despite overall mobile decline

2008 year-end numbers show Nokia had 38.6 per cent of all 1.21 billion mobile phone shipments globally, followed by Samsung, LG, Motorola, Sony and RIM.

Smart phones made up about 14 per cent of all mobile devices shipped globally in 2008 and should increase to more than 17 per cent of the total in 2009, according to new projections from ABI Research in New York.

However, the expected increase in smart phone shipments in 2009 will occur even as the overall total number of mobile devices shipped declines from 1.21 billion in 2008 to 1.17 in 2009, a drop of 2.5 per cent, ABI analyst Kevin Burden said.

The gloomy global economy will be one factor in the decline for all mobile device shipments in 2009, but another is how uncomfortable consumers have become with sophisticated new devices that they don't understand how to use fully, Burden said in an interview.

"We're seeing that people already have in their possession capable phones with color screens and more, and it may be that they already have the phone they are happy with," Burden said. "So the bad economy becomes an excuse not to get a more sophisticated phone. It's a question of simplicity and of getting a mobile phone with features beyond their capability to use."

One theme of several recent CTIA and International CES trade shows has been how new handhelds are often shipped with so many features and functions that users hardly ever use 10 per cent of all the features, or even learn how to use them, Burden and other analysts have said.

So, if overall new mobile phones are so sophisticated that users might not want to buy a new one, why would smart phones like the iPhone be growing in popularity, with shipments expected to increase in 2009? According to Burden, smart phones started selling only recently, and their growth is "magnified" by the early-adopter effect of one group of users wanting to try something new.

ABI said that about 116 million smart phones shipped globally in 2007, which mushroomed to 171 million in 2008 and should reach 203 million in 2009. That percentage increase from 2008 to 2009 is an increase of 18 per cent, which Burden called "slow growth" in comparison to what should have happened were the economy better.

For all of 2008, the first half of mobile handset shipments was 14 per cent higher than the first half of 2007, which dropped to 8 per cent for the third quarter compared with the same quarter of 2007, ABI said. Then in the fourth quarter, shipments "crashed" by 10 per cent compared with the final quarter of 2007. "Sheer fear sapped the confidence of consumers, enterprises and corporate users across the board," said Jake Saunders, an ABI analyst, in a statement.

ABI also released 2008 year-end numbers showing that Nokia had 38.6 per cent of all 1.21 billion mobile phone shipments globally, followed by Samsung Electronics at 16.2 per cent, LG Electronics at 8.3 per cent, Motorola at 8.3 per cent, Sony Ericsson at 8 per cent, Research in Motion at 1.9 per cent, Kyocera at 1.4 per cent, Apple (shipping two versions of iPhone) at 1.1 per cent, HTC at 1.1 per cent, Sharp at 1 per cent and all others at 14 per cent.

Burden called RIM and Apple the boldest movers in 2008 with new devices, and said they are likely "to continue their march to the consumer center stage." HTC also brought out the Android-based G1 and has significant contracts for 2009 that should play to its advantage, he added.

Motorola lost the most market share, dropping by 5 per cent in the rankings, which was better than 2007 when Motorola dropped nearly 8 per cent in the rankings.

"It will be a tough year for Motorola but it needs to deliver handsets that draw back the once-faithful Motorola purchaser before it is truly too late," Burden added. "The challenge is that purchasers in 2009 will be very, very picky."

Tags mobile phoneSMART PHONE

Recommended

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Matt Hamblen

Computerworld (US)

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?