Elgan: 'Getting Things Done' to go

Three free tools power the ultimate GTD system for digital nomads.

I'll admit it. I'm one of those annoying "Getting Things Done" fanboys. I love David Allen's productivity system, which he lays out in three books: Getting Things Done, Ready For Anything and the brand-new Making It All Work.

I recommend that everyone buy all three books. They pay for themselves -- both the time and money you invest -- in weeks or even days. And the peace of mind his system gives you is priceless.

If you'd like to first familiarize yourself with Allen's methodology, please check out the Wikipedia or WikiSummaries entries. (Note: Normally, Computerworld does not reference wiki-based information, but I can vouch for the fidelity of both these entries.)

Allen's system is flexible; you can choose your own software and systems for storing your information. His suggestions, however, default to physical in-boxes, ink pens, index cards and paper folders as primary methods for collecting, processing, organizing and reviewing actions, projects, goals and the like.

Most technology-loving people (the kind who would be reading this article on this site) avoid the physical and gravitate toward the digital, usually Microsoft Outlook. Dedicated Getting Things Done (GTD) applications exist. Mobile professionals add a smart phone to the mix for capturing ideas and information.

All this is great. But for digital nomads, there are three missing elements to the standard setup used by most GTD enthusiasts.

1. Ability to capture hands-free. Sometimes you can't stop what you're doing and type on a smart phone, but you need to capture an idea or send yourself a reminder.

2. Graceful handling of recurring tasks. Many of our tasks are recurring actions -- daily, weekly, monthly or even annually. And it's great to be able to quickly switch frequencies (from, say, daily reminders to weekly).

Tags digital productivity

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Mike Elgan

Computerworld

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?