Build your own PC in seven steps

Simple tips from motherboard to graphics and Blu-ray drive

together an entire PC isn't as scary as it sounds — and it's well worth the hassle. We've put together a simple guide to assembling a PC in seven steps.

Earth yourself and discharge any static before you begin the assembly process. The motherboard and processor should be installed first, but you can fit other internal components in whichever order you find easiest, given the layout constraints of your chosen case and the cabling associated with each.

1. Carefully slide off the side of the PC case and lay it down on its side. The InWin case we've used here had a fan already attached, so we need to work around that.

First, we'll place our AMD Gigabyte motherboard in position. As well as ensuring we have the right number and positioning of risers, we need to remove a blanking plate on the case so the USB and monitor connections can be used to attach peripherals.

Having checked what goes where, carefully screw the motherboard in place.

step1

Step 1: Open up the PC

2. Next, we need to fit the AMD processor. Your CPU may have come with fixative. This is to ensure a good connection and current flow. Smear a thin layer over the back of the processor before lowering it in place. Lock the heatsink over the top.

step2

Step 2: Fit the processor

3. Now we can add memory. Depending on your chosen build, either install a single RAM module or a pair of matching ones.

Check your dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) run at the same clock speed as each other and have the same amount of RAM. Push them gently but firmly into place, applying downward pressure at each end. Push their retainer clips into place.

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Rosemary Haworth

PC Advisor (UK)

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