Hands-on: The new multitouch MacBook Pro

If you like the iPhone's touch screen, you'll like this laptop's trackpad

The same great design

Although I've been a fan of the 17-inch MacBook Pros -- and before them, the PowerBooks -- most Mac laptop users I know like the size and portability of the 15-inch models. If that's you, you'll be happy to know that the latest batch of MacBook Pros are largely unchanged.

I was afraid after reviewing the new MacBook Air that Apple would move its pro line to the black keyboard prominent in the Air. This design works, sort of, in the slim, trim Air, but it would cheapen the look of the MacBook Pro. Apple, thankfully, heard my silent plea and stayed with the same style as the previous models -- and as before, the keyboard is illuminated in dimly lit areas.

As always, even the base MacBook Pro comes full featured, offering two FireWire ports (one of them FireWire 800) and two USB 2.0 ports, a built-in iSight Webcam, a super-sharp LCD, 802.11n Wi-Fi access, Bluetooth for easy pairing with wireless accessories and phones, and a DVI port for connecting to external monitors. Unlike the MacBook Air, the 15-inch model also offers an ExpressCard/34 slot. There's probably a kitchen sink inside, too.

Multitouch makes the difference

What sets the new MacBook Pros apart from their predecessors is the trackpad. Apple is understandably proud of this new feature, which mimics the finger gestures used to navigate around its popular iPhone. It was introduced with the MacBook Air, but it's not included in the new MacBook models also unveiled last month. I expect this feature to work its way down the food chain, so look for it in the next generation of MacBooks.

Multitouch allows you do a variety of things, depending on which app you're working with. In fact, Apple has included an interactive system preference pane to show you exactly which motion performs what task. If you're not used to pinching, twirling and swiping, you should definitely check it out first. Under System Preferences, go to Keyboard & Mouse and click on the tab that says Trackpad.

If you're surfing the Web with Safari, you can swipe back and forth between pages using three fingers. No more scrolling around to the back and forward buttons in the Safari toolbar, no more need for the Command-Arrow key combo. You can use the pinch motion to decrease the font size of Web pages, or a reverse pinch to make text size larger. It's elegant in its simplicity and implementation, and it quickly becomes second nature with regular use -- so much so that I keep trying to swipe between pages on my older 17-inch MacBook Pro. No dice.

Multitouch is even more useful in programs like Apple's iPhoto app. Here you can scroll around photos when you're editing or viewing them and rotate them using two fingers. It takes a bit of getting used to, but once you're comfortable rotating, swiping and pinching, you won't want to go back to clicking and mousing to accomplish the same tasks. The same gestures are available in the latest version of Apple's Aperture 2 app, and my guess is we'll see them show up in more programs in the months ahead.

Already developers are coming up with ways to extend multitouch features. One of these you might consider trying is called MultiClutch. This little app, still in beta, installs an input manager that basically translates keyboard commands into common multitouch gestures for different applications. It is a beta, but users haven't reported any major problems with it. So if you have one of the new MacBook Pros, or a MacBook Air, and you're looking to extend the multitouch gestures available, it's worth checking out.

Unlike the larger trackpad in the MacBook Air, the trackpads in the new MacBook Pros are unchanged in size. No doubt, Apple didn't want to revamp the case by adding a larger trackpad, but it makes sense to do so, given the new multitouch capabilities offered. A bigger trackpad offers more room to pinch, twirl and swipe.

Join the Good Gear Guide newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Ken Mingis

Computerworld

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?