New Naked ADSL2+ over dial-free phone lines

Internode launches its Naked ADSL2+ broadband service designed to appeal to ‘early adopters’.

Internode has launched its first Naked ADSL2+ broadband service – designed to appeal to 'early adopters' – which will be available at 350 telephone exchanges across Australia and deliver an ADSL2+ service over a dial-free phone line.

The Australian owned ISP says this is just the start of its Naked ADSL2+ plans with further enhancements expected this year – as it greatly extends its existing footprint of 100 ADSL2+ exchanges.

Internode will also release variations of its Naked ADSL2+ service this year, with features including Annex M (high-speed upstream), Annex L (long-range services) and support for number porting (allowing its customers to transfer their existing telephone number).

Customers should note that the Naked ADSL2+ services operate on a copper line that contains no dial tone, which means that the line does not support functions such as fax machines and phone calls during a power failure. This is an important consideration if planning to make the switch, although Internode's NodePhone product manager Jim Kellett said the new Naked ADSL2+ services were not intended as a direct replacement of a traditional telephone service.

"Our main target is customers who are just after a broadband service, not necessarily a voice solution, [this is designed for] high speed ADSL2+ seekers," he said.

Through its network agreement with Optus Wholesale, Internode has priced its entry-level Naked ADSL2+ plan at $59.95 for an ADSL2+ service with a 5GB monthly download limit, the NodePhone1 service, and untimed 18-cent national calls.

Kellett says, there is a set of seven residential plans, that go up in terms of quota and plan price, and there are two different flavours of business plans too, SOHO and Business.

The company estimates that the new service, with its potential for no third-party line rental charges, will offer customers a potential saving of approximately $20 each month when stacked up against paying for a separate voice line and broadband service.

"In numeric terms it will drive residential customers, but it is also attractive to small businesses," Kellett said. "There is more for them to save too, with many small businesses paying more for phone lines and they need high speed ADSL2+."

Following its four-month trial, which started in November using the Optus Wholesale footprint, Internode has decided to offer its Naked ADSL2+ service for new connections only, with a $149 setup cost. Plans to launch a service to convert existing 'voice lines' to Naked ADSL2+ mode are set for mid-year.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Amanda Conroy

PC World

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?