Storage on demand set to Mozy its way into Australian enterprise

By 2011, 25 per cent of all software delivered via SaaS model

Driven by the demand for infrastructure savings and the growth of Web 2.0 applications, EMC is set to expand its Software as a Service (SaaS) offering to Australian shores.

Available in the second half of 2008, SaaS is part of a broad industry trend which allows organizations to access storage on demand without investing in infrastructure.

Gartner predicts 25 per cent of all software will be delivered via a SaaS model by 2011,

EMC Australia product marketing manager, Shane Moore, said research shows an average of 30-50 per cent total cost of ownership savings for customers deploying SaaS as opposed to the inhouse route.

EMC this week released MozyEnterprise for online backup of desktops, laptops and remote Windows servers.

"Mozy is targetted at those organisations looking for a cost-effective, consistent, and dependable way to backup; the savings on data centre space, power, cooling and IT management time can be reallocated for other purposes," Moore said.

Mozy is the first application to be built on EMC Fortress, a secure, hardened enterprise class platform for SaaS delivery.

Part of EMC's new SaaS business unit, the platform provides customers with centralised billing, management and metering.

Further applications will be available via Fortress in the coming year focusing on trusted data services.

Moore said currently more than 500,000 business and consumer users rely on Mozy for backup including General Electric, NTG Systems and Free the Children, which is the world's largest network of children helping children through education.

It involves more than one million youth in 45 countries.

The IT director for Free the Children, Aimable Mugara, said Mozy is used both domestic and abroad for automated backup and the ability to recover data if anything happens to the computer.

Mugara said Mozy's business continuity solution helps to maximise uptime and provide critical data recovery while minimizing gaps in data protection.

The SaaS offering follows EMC's US$76 million acquisition of Mozy in September, 2007.

The owner of Mozy, Berkeley Data Systems, was founded in 2005 and funded for $1.9 million by Wasatch Partners, Tim Draper and Novell co-founder Drew Major.

Features of MozyEnterprise include authentication and other security features from RSA as well as rapid deployment options including physical seeding up to 2 TB for larger devices to speed up the delivery of rollouts.

EMC claims the remote data protection features are comparable to a solution that would cost 10 times more than Mozy.

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Sandra Rossi

Computerworld

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