Jango launches new custom Internet radio service

Users can create and share personalized radio stations

Jango this week announced the public release of its online radio service that lets users create and share personalized radio stations.

The site has been in beta test mode for the past four months, signing up more than 300,000 listeners who have created 600,000 stations. The Jango service, available without charge, does not require downloads, searches or playlist, the company noted.

A user types in the name of a musician and a first station starts playing their music; users can then further customize Jango by rating songs and adding more musicians, it said.

"Until now, there just wasn't a free and easy way to get the music you want online," said Jango CEO Dan Kaufman in a statement. "Jango is as easy as a Google search. In literally seconds, you can create a totally customized radio station that plays exactly what you want to hear."

The site also is centered around a community, allowing users to see who is listening to the same music, who is tuning into the stations a user has developed and what his or her friends are listening to at any given time. When a user tunes into someone else's station, that person will see the user is there and can interact with that person online, Jango added.

"Jango is more social than other music sites because people tune in to each others' stations all the time" added Kaufman. "It's a great way to discover new music - and just like in the offline world, music is more fun with friends."

In the future, Jango has plans to launch a mini-player that streams music while browsing other sites. The company described the "Jango Jukebox" as an embeddable widget for blogs, MySpace, Facebook and other Web sites.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Heather Havenstein

Computerworld

Comments

Comments are now closed.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?