Tomato looks to capture an audience in local flash market

Can flash media cards be turned into a funky tech commodity? Mint Wireless, distributor of the just released Tomato flash products believes so.

"Our dream goal is for people to ask for Tomato Flash like they do for an iPod," said Andrew Teoh, executive director of Mint Wirreless.

Australia joins Korea and India as the latest country to offer the cards which are produced by Taiwanese-based Dynacard.

T.M. Koh, president of Dynacard, said the company chose the Tomato name because of the positive experiences that have been delivered from technology products under fruit monikers: Apple's iPod, Orange's mobile brand, and Blackberry's wireless communicators.

The Tomato Flash range consists of Multi-card readers, CompactFlash, Memory Sticks, microSD, miniSD, Secure digital, USB drives and SDHD. A product which it claims to be a world first is the Power SD Card which is like Russian doll for Flash. It contains a Micro SD, Mini SD and SD Card all in one device. The Tomato Flash products are water resistant and come with an international lifetime warranty.

Despite the Australian market being served by already familiar brands such as Lexar and SanDisk, Koh believes the market is large enough for a new entrant.

"This business in the next 5-10 years has a lot of potential and we have a chance to reveal ourselves in terms of price, quality and service."

Teoh said Mint will be responsible for delivering the products to telcos, corporate, education and even convenience store markets which includes petrol stations. Melbourne-based Adeal, a distributor of photographic products from companies such as Samsung and Manfrotto, will be responsible for taking the product to the retail chains.

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Howard Dahdah

PC World

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